Archive for the 'MLB' Category

NL East Predictions

Saturday, March 21st, 2020

The last of the divisions. With a shortened season on the horizon myworld may have picked differently. Sustainability won’t be as critical with less games to play. A team like the Mets may be able to survive with five starting pitchers for an 81 game season, or what number of games major league baseball decides to play.

The east may be the beast this year with four teams vying for control of the top spot. We believe in karma so this year we are picking the Phillies so Bryce Harper can get revenge on National fans for razzing him after the Nats World Series victory without him. One thing myworld learned from all the sports I played is never gloat too much over a victory because it only motivates another to beat you even more. So on to our last division picks. If you want to see the other division picks just click on one of the teams in the subject and it should bring them up.

1. Philadelphia Phillies

Good - They lost a third baseman in Maikel Franco, but he will not be as critical to replace as Anthony Rendon for the Nationals or Josh Donaldson for the Braves. If Jake Arrieta can get back to his form of two years ago the Phillies have three good starters to throw each day. Aaron Nola and Zack Wheeler should be poised for break out seasons. J.T. Realmuto was a good pickup last year. He is one of the better catchers in the National League and provides excellent offense.

Bad - The outfield leaves a lot to be desired. Bryce Harper can put up numbers but they appear to be short in left and center. Andrew McCutchen needs to get back from an injury plagued year last year, but he is getting older and comebacks at his age become more difficult. The Phillies hope to get sometbing from former first round pick Adam Haseley. Jay Bruce hit 26 homeruns last year but that came with a .216 average and a .261 OBA. The Phillies still need to decide where to play the trio of Scott Kingery, Didi Gregorius and Jean Segura. Didi at short, Scott at third and Jean at second seems to make the most sense, but moving them around could hurt the defense. Didi has always played short while Scott and Jean have played other positions.

Ugly - Harper had a career high 114 RBIs but he also had a career high 178 whiffs. His walk numbers also decreased significantly. Perhaps he was trying too hard to make something happen but his swing and miss game is getting more frequent than his power game. That has had a significant impact on his batting average.

Rookies - Spencer Howard is the favorite to win the fifth spot in the rotation. His triple digit heat is tough to hit and in a shortened season the innings limitation is not as big of a factor. The 2017 first round pick has not pitched over 112 innings in a season, but 15 starts in a 81 game season with an average of six innings per start only eats up 90 innings. Adonis Medina is another hard throwing pitcher who could see some starts. If the Phillies want to add some pop to the lineup they could bring up Alec Bohm to play third and move Kingery to the outfield.

Predicted Finish - It will be a dog fight but the Phillies will be the surprise winner.

2. Atlanta Braves

Good - They have good, young starting pitchers but the key to their success will be the consistency of Mike Foltynewicz. He went from their ace in 2018 to optioned to the minors in 2019. It’s a young rotation with a lot being asked of Mike Soroka and Max Fried. Felix Hernandez may win a rotation spot but he will eventually be replaced by either Kyle Wright or Ian Anderson as the season winds down and the Braves need a win. Ronald Acuna has transformed his skills into an MVP caliber player, He plays solid defense, hits for power and steals bases. He is the Mookie Betts of the Braves. Freddie Freeman is one of those players who you turn around to watch after you hear the sound of the ball off his bat during batting practice. He is just a professional hitter who always seems to drive in the big runs. Ozzie Albies is one of the better second baseman in the league and he continues to get better. He hits for power, gets on base, steals bases and has scored more than 100 runs the last two seasons.

Bad - Replacing the production of Josh Donaldson will hurt. Austin Riley is the best power source, but he can run hot and cold. His defense is also not as strong, so when he is running cold he contributes little to the team. The Braves may settle on the vanilla like production of Johan Camargo, who put up decent numbers in 2018 when he got regular playing time. The bullpen lacks a closer though the Braves hope the 11 saves Mark Melancon gave them last year is not a mirage. His last big save year was 2016. Shane Greene is another option, though most of his saves with the Tigers did not come with a team fighting for the playoffs.

Ugly - They could have some issues behind the plate. Travis D’Arnaud has had issues staying healthy. If he goes down their alternative is Tyler Flowers. He has not hit over .230 the last two years. He also struck out 105 times in his 271 at bats last year. That is really ugly. If those two go down the Braves will have to rely on rookies Alex Jackson, William Contreras or Shea Langeliers. It would be asking a lot of any of the three rookies to catch in the heat of a pennant race, but they could be better alternatives.

Rookies - Ender Inciarte has had issues staying healthy. Expect either Cristian Pache or Drew Waters to get some centerfield time while he is down. It could be difficult taking them out of the lineup once Inciarte comes back. Pitching is their strong suit. Ian Anderson, Kyle Wright and Bryse Wilson will all be waiting for an injury or ineffectiveness from a starting pitcher to get their opportunity. Jasseel de la Cruz has been a starter in the minors, but his triple digit heat gives him closer stuff. He could find himself in the bullpen by mid season.

Expected Finish - Second place but still good enough for a wild card spot.

3. Washington Nationals

Good - The starting pitching is four deep with Stephen Strasburg, Max Scherzer, Patrick Corbin and Anibal Sanchez. The big question is how all the innings in the playoff race impact their 2020 season. The upside is it will probably be a shortened season so the fatigue factor of the 80th game in September will not be as great as the 160th game. Juan Soto has improved his defense to such a degree that he is average to above average in left. He even got some gold flove consideration. His offensive game also keeps improving each year. If he had speed he could be the equivalent of Ronald Acuna, but he doesn’t.

Bad - The other two outfield spots need to step it up. Victor Robles is a phenomenal defensive centerfielder, but his bat is best fitted for the eight hole. Adam Eaton lacks the power other teams have with their rightfielders. The right side of their infield could be new. Howie Kendrick is probably better playing first, but he could get most of his time at second, where his defense is atrocious. Starlin Castro is another option but his offensive production is nothing special. Asdrubal Cabrera could be the best fit if he doesn’t play third. The Nationals would prefer this because that would mean Carter Kieboom won the third base spot. First base will be a platoon of Eric Thames and Ryan Zimmerman. The Z-man may be asked to come in later in games to play defense. This position will provide below average offensive numbers, not what you need when you’re trying to replace the offense lost by the departure of Anthony Rendon. Eric needs to replicate his KBO numbers.

Ugly - Rookie Carter Kieboom is being asked to replace the offense of Anthony Rendon. That is a lot to be placing on a rookie. If he fails Asdrubal Cabrera will take over the position until Kieboom produces in the minors. No matter who they put out there he will fall short of the numbers Rendon provided. That could be the difference between making the playoffs and watching them on television.

Rookies - Carter Kieboom will get every opportunity to replace Rendon at third. Last year he got a brief callup to replace Trea Turner at short and only hit .128 in an 11 game trial. Will Crowe will compete for a fifth spot in the rotation but he is not an impact pitcher. Tres Barrera will see some time at catcher if injuries put either Kurt Suzuki or Yan Gomes on the disabled list. His future may be as a backup.

Expected Finish - The loss of Rendon will be too much and they will fall just short of the playoffs.

4. New York Mets

Good - The fact that Steven Matz is competing for the fifth spot in the Mets rotation tells me the starting pitching should be good if it stays healthy. The acquisitions of Rick Porcello and Michael Wacha give them one extra starting pitcher. They may need him with the injury history of Noah Syndergaard. Jacob deGrom should still put up Cy Young numbers and Marcus Stroman pitches big. The Mets need another solid year from Peter Alonso. A sophomore slump will stagnant the offense. Amed Rosario came on strong with the bat in the second half. If he can get more consistency with his defense he could become one of the top shortstops in the league. No matter where you put Jeff McNeil his bat will hit. With Robinson Cano slated for second McNeil will play third. Michael Conforto is a good run producer in right field.

Bad - Wilson Ramos will have to provide better offense if he wants to continue as the starting catcher. His defense took a big hit last year with base runners taking advantage of his slow release. A lot of that blame could be placed on the pitchers inability to hold runners. Robinson Cano has seemed to have lost a lot. If Yoenis Cespedes makes the team the Mets would be better putting J.D. Davis at third, moving McNeil to second and benching Cano. Brandon Nimmo and Jake Marisnick may platoon in center but their bats will not provide much. Playoff teams win up the middle and the Mets fall short in three of the four positions.

Ugly - Edwin Diaz will not be the closer if he replicates his 5.59 ERA last year. Those are ugly numbers, the kind of numbers you would expect by a pitcher in Colorado. If Diaz fails as the closer and Cano sits the bench Mets fans will be brought to tears when they see Jarred Kelenic put up MVP numbers and Justin Dunn win a spot in the Mariners rotation. Cano and Diaz need to get the Mets into the playoffs to make that deal not look like a robbery.

Rookies - Andres Gimenez is probably a better defensive shortstop than Amed Rosario. If Amed continues to struggle with his defense at short he could be moved to center and Gimenez given the job at short. At worst Gimenez should fill a utility role. That is about it. Unfortunately for the Mets, they have no more Pete Alonso’s in their farm system.

Expected Finish - Fourth place but still close enough to battle for a play off spot.

5. Miami Marlins

Good - Whether you put him at third or right field Brian Anderson hits. He could have a break out season in 2020. Jorge Alfaro continues to get better with the bat each year. He could also have a break out year. Combining the break out years of Anderson and Alfaro could make the Marlins a surprise team in the NL East. Jonathan Villar can play anywhere if the Marlins are short of offense at a particular position. He could become the Marwin Gonzales of the Marlins.

Bad - The starting pitching is young and full of promise but it will have its days of being battered. Sandy Alcantara will continue his development as an ace but behind him they will struggle to contain offenses. Ryan Stanek will continue his role as an opener. In the last two years he has started 56 games but thrown only 143 innings, many of those in relief. The Marlins will have to hope for a resurgence from Jesus Aguilar or first base could be stagnant at producing any offense.

Ugly - Offense. They have none. Too many back up players being put in starting roles. Lewis Brinson will get a third opportunity in centerfield, but he has yet to hit over .200. Jesus Sanchez waits in the minor leagues. Myworld does not know the fascination with Isan Diaz. He is not a player that has hit for average, even in the minor leagues. With a young pitching staff, this offense will not be give the pitching staff a lot of runs.

Rookies - Don’t know how many times Brinson will get to fail in center field, but Jesus Sanchez is a potential five tool player. Of course, when the Marlins acquired Brinson from the Brewers in the Christian Yelich trade he had the same tool set as Sanchez. Some of the starting pitchers will probably fail, which will give opportunities for Sixto Sanchez and Edward Cabrera to debut in the organization. Like Sandy Alcantara they throw heat. Monte Harrison needs to cure his proclivity to swing and miss to earn a spot in center field. He has impressive tools if he can make better contact. Lewin Diaz could get an opportunity to take over first base if Jesus Aguilar fails. Lewin carries impressive power on his 6′4″ frame. First round picks Braxton Garrett and Trevor Rogers have been kind of forgotten, Braxton missing a year for Tommy John surgery, but both could contribute to the rotation with good years.

Expected Finish - Too much in this division for them to finish anywhere but last.

Top Prospects from Panama

Friday, March 20th, 2020

The last time myworld did a top ten prospect list from Panama was in 2016. Interesting that three of the players on this year’s list (Miguel Amaya, Edmundo Sosa and Javy Guerra) made the 2020 list. Since then we have done an All Carribean list team, the last of which appears to have been in 2018. There were three Panamanian players to make that list. Jamie Barria pitched in relief for the Angels in 2018 and 2019 and has graduated from prospect status. Another, Jonathan Arauz, did not make this list, while Leonardo Jimenez earned an appearance at the back end of the 2020 Panama list.

The growth of baseball in Panama appears to be greater now than Nicaragua, which used to be the hot bed of baseball in the Central American countries. They won the Series del Caribe back in 2019 when they were first allowed to participate. Last year they missed making the playoffs but they were competitive against the beasts of the Caribbean. So the quality of players signing out of there is improving, allowing myworld to put together a top ten list. The top three from this list are quality while the players that fall below that are still too raw to make an true assessment of what their major league potential may be.

1. Miguel Amaya C (Cubs) - He was number two on the 2016 list but was beaten out by a number of players from the Bahamas for the Caribbean list. The Cubs paid $1 million to sign him in 2015, unusual for a prospect coming out of Panama. For Panama he earns a position on top of this list for his ability to hit as well as play defense. His defense may be a little more ahead of his offensive game at this point, but in the last two years he has hit 23 homeruns. Last year he only hit .235 but he showed excellent plate discipline with a 54/69 walk to whiff ratio, resulting in a .351 OBA. His arm was strong enough to throw out 35 percent of baserunners who tried to steal against him, but he still needs to work on some of the other tools to become a polished defensive catcher. He is still a couple years away from making the Cubs and will open in AA next year when the season starts. The Cubs have been talking about trading Wilson Contreras and Miguel is the heir apparent, but it would be best to wait until 2021 to give him the catching positon.

2. Ivan Herrera C (Cardinals) - Ivan was signed a year after Miguel. The Cardinals gave him a $200,000 bonus. Ivan is also known for his solid defense, though his arm is not as strong as Miguel. He also does not carry the power of Miguel though there is some hope the power will develop once he matures. At this point he does have the ability to hit for a better average than Miguel, coming into the 2020 season with a career .309 average. The strikeouts are few and he has the ability to take a walk, owning a career .397 OBA. Last year he appeared in 18 High A games. That is where he should begin the 2020 season, receiving a promotion to AA once he has had success at High A.

3. Daniel Espino RHP (Indians) - Daniel was born in Panama but moved to the United States while a sophomore in high school. He went from throwing in the mid-80s to being the hardest thrower in high school baseball, earning himself a first round selection of the Indians in the 2019 draft. They paid him a $2.5 million bonus, something he would have never gotten if he had stayed in Panama. Espino throws in the mid-90s and has hit the triple digits with his fastball. He also has three developing secondary pitches that should allow him to stay in the starting rotation. Next year, he should start the season in full season, but do not expect him to be wearing an Indians uniform for at least another three years.

4. Reggie Preciado SS (Padres) - Reggie led Panama to the silver medal in the U15 World Cup, one of three players from that team selected to the All tournament team. He hit .393 and drove in 9 runs during the tournament, motivating the Padres to shell out $1.3 million to sign him in 2019. He did not play in 2019 but should make his debut in the rookie league or the Dominican summer league in 2020. A 6′4″ switch hitter, he should carry a lot of power in his bat. If he continues to grow he could be forced to move from short, but the power will play in the outfield or at third base. Plus, Fernando Tatis appears to have the position locked up for a few years at short. His father played two years in the Yankee farm system so he has a mentor who can tell him how to succeed to the major leagues.

5. Edmundo Sosa SS (Cardinals) - Edmundo appeared on the 2016 Panama list as the number three prospect, just behind Amaya. Edmundo was signed in 2012 for $450,000. He has been playing long enough that a lot is already known about him. His power is rather limited, though last year with the juiced up major league ball he hit a career high 17 homeruns, He also hit a career high .291. Patience at the plate is lacking as evidence by his 17/96 walk to whiff ratio. With better pitching the batting average could dwarf more towards the .250s. Defensively, he does nothing spectacular, but the tools are there to play shortstop. This would seem to make him an ideal candidate for a utility role. He has gotten brief callups the last two years with the Cardinals. Expect at some point he fills the utility role.

6. Benyamin Bailey OF (White Sox) - Bailey signed in 2019 for just $35,000. What puts him on this list is his impressive season in the Dominican Summer League where he hit .324, with a .931 OPS and a 52/40 walk to whiff ratio. Those numbers will be difficult to repeat once he goes stateside. He stands 6′5″ and is fast afoot with the ability to hit for power. Those are two impressive tools, especially for a patient hitter who appears to make good contact. His speed is not good enough to play center, but he could play either corner, though a below average arm could destine him for left. In 2020, after some time in extended spring training he should debut in one of the short season leagues. It will be interesting if his walk to whiff ratio remains as impressive as a 18 year old.

7. Humberto Mejia RHP (Marlins) - Humberto signed for just $50,000 in 2013. Despite that early start he still has not played beyond High A. The entire 2017 season was missed because of shoulder issues and last year was his first season in full season ball experience. He stands 6′3″ and can touch the mid-90s with his fastball, but it sits mostly in the low 90s. His breaking pitches (slider and curve) are his swing and miss offerings. His control of the strike zone limited the opposition to just a .177 average. He could start next season in High A before getting promoted to AA, but the higher he goes the better able those hitters are for hitting breaking pitches. Humberto seems to have the command to locate his pitches to create a challenge. His biggest test will be staying healthy and getting to the 100 inning level for the first time in his career.

8. Sadrac Franco RHP (Angels) - Sadrac was signed in 2017 for $50,000. He still has not gotten past the short season ball, though injuries have limited his ability to pitch. Last year was the first time he got an opportunity to start, getting in eight games. Despite just standing 6′0″ he can hum the fastball across the plate in the high 90s, but it generally sits in the upper edges of the low 90s. His secondary pitches still need a significant amount of work to stay in the rotation. Finding the plate a bit more would also improve his chances of staying in the rotation. The 2020 season should see Sadrac rise to full season ball.

9. Leonardo Jimenez SS (Blue Jays) - The Jays spit out $850,000 to sign Jimenez in 2017. In two years he has yet to hit a homeruns and his career slugging is .360, so if there is power in the bat it has not arrived yet. His bat does spray the gaps giving him a career .278 minor league average. The defensive tools are there to play shortstop, though his slow foot speed could require a move to second. Leonardo will turn 19 in May. He needs to gain some bulk to put more juice on the ball if he hopes to remain a starter. He has the defensive tools to make it as a utility player. The 2020 season should see him start the season in Low A.

10. Javy Guerra RHP (Padres) - The Padres acquired Javy from the Red Sox for Craig Kimbrel. He appeared to have all the tools to be the Padres shortstop of the future, especially with an extremely strong arm that could throw rockets. Unfortunately, he struggled to hit, failing to recognize breaking pitches and striking out way too much to get his average above .220. With the arm the Padres converted Javy to a pitcher in 2019. His fastball zipped across the plate in the high 90s and his slider is a very effective pitch. He even made his major league debut last year with eight bullpen appearances. A lack of a third pitch and struggles finding the strike zone will keep him in relief. Getting a better handle on that command could put him in a closer role.

Top Prospects from Puerto Rico

Tuesday, March 17th, 2020

A couple years ago Puerto Rico was flush with prospects like Javier Baez, Francisco Lindor, Eddie Rosario, Jose Berrios and the list goes on. The discussion about the major league draft stunting the development of Puerto Rican players from being drafted seemed to have disappeared (high school baseball does not exist in Puerto Rico so they rely on academies for players between 14-18). Finding prospects the last couple years has been difficult. Even having Puerto Ricans drafted higher than the second round is rare. Below are the top rated prospects that myworld was able to link to Puerto Rico.

Isan Diaz (# 2 prospect) and Tomas Nido (#3) were the only players to graduate from last year’s list. Four players dropped off. That left room for six new players to appear on the list, one of those who has appeared in previous lists when he was a Dodger.

1. Heliot Ramos OF (Giants) - The only true top rated prospect on this list, he was the number one Puerto Rican prospect last year and he will probably be number one next year. Heliot was a first round pick of the Giants in 2017, the last first round pick from Puerto Rico. The tools are average or above in all areas of his game. The speed is there to play centerfield, but he may fit better in right. Last year he hit .306 with 13 homeruns in High A but slumped to .242 in AA. The power is there but so is the ability to swing and miss. With his arrival, along with Hunter Bishop, to the major league club it would end the drought the Giants have had of developing outfielders. It will be 2021 before he wears a Giant uniform, unless he tears it up in the minor leagues.

2. Mario Feliciano C (Brewers) - The island nation has been a breeding ground for developing catchers with Ivan Rodriguez, the Molina brothers, etc. as exemplary examples. Mario hopes to add his name to that list. The Brewers drafted him in the second round (supplemental) draft in 2016. He was eighth on this list last year but his season was limited to 42 games because of injuries and he hit only .205. His strong defense and arm got him placed on this list. This year his bat showed up with a .273 average and 19 homeruns in High A for a .477 slugging. A 29/139 walk to whiff ratio is cause for concern, but the underlying factor is Mario plays a solid defense, and if that power shows up enough it will be good enough to get him in the starting lineup. He is still a year away from the Brewers.

3. Willi Castro SS (Tigers) - Myworld just assumed Willi was from the Dominican Republic, but he was born in Puerto Rico and grew up in the Dominican. The Indians signed him in 2013 then shipped him off to the Tigers in the Leonys Martin trade. While Martin now spends his time in Japan, Castro made his major league debut with the Tigers last year. There are not any tools that wow you with Castro. He is a decent fielder, could hit for double digit homerun power and last year in AAA slapped the ball around for a .301 average. That will probably translate to a .250 average in the major leagues, especially if he does not improve on his 6/34 walk to whiff ratio in his major league debut. While the Tigers rebuild he could fill the shortstop position, then move to a utility role once they find a better alternative.

4. Edwin Rios 1B (Dodgers) - The Dodgers drafted Rios in the sixth round of the 2015 draft. Last year the souped up baseball in AAA allowed Edwin to slug 31 homeruns. He hit another four when making his major league debut with the Dodgers. Defensively there is not a lot there to make you want to play him, so the bat needs to stay alive to keep him in the lineup. The Dodgers seem to be loaded with power bats they can put at first base and at 26 the time for Rios to be playing is now. His best bet for a starting role may be a trade or movement to the KBO.

5. Matthew Lugo SS (Red Sox) - Lugo was the highest Puerto Rican selected in the 2019 draft, the last pick of the second round regular phase. He is the nephew of Carlos Beltran and trained in his facility. The bat has the potential for power, even though it failed to show last year with his .326 slugging percentage in 46 rookie league games. His lower half could be a bit thick to stay at short so a move to second is in his future. Expect him to play full season ball next year. Any discussion of the major leagues is a few years away.

6. Yan Contreras SS (Reds) - Another Puerto Rican middle infielder drafted in 2019, but Yan lasted until the 12th round. He was signed mostly for his defense but he will need to hit better than .145 for the Reds to continue to throw him out there. The bright spot was that he drew 14 walks in 20 games, so his ability to get on base (.298 OBA) was not bad. He also runs well, hitting two triples and stealing four bases. He will probably see another year in rookie ball before the Reds expose him to full season ball pitching. He is a few years away from the major leagues, and if his bat does not produce may never climb higher than A ball.

7. Victor Torres C (White Sox) - Victor was an 11th round pick in 2019. He was expected to go higher in the draft. Defense is his calling card with the arm and quickness to control a running game. He also has the ability to call a game and run a pitching staff. Last year he hit only .219, with just two of his 21 hits going for extra bases (both doubles). The Sox thnk he has the ability to hit, but he will probably need one more year in short season ball to prove that. If he can play defense making it as a backup is a possibility, but the bat will have to show up to be an impact catcher in the majors.

8. Erik Rivera OF/LHP (Angels) - Rivera was a fourth round pick in 2019. The Angels are looking at him as a two way player to take advantage of the new roster rules. The big hitting tool for Rivera will be his power, but his inability to make contact will inhibit his ability to get to that power. Last year he failed to go deep in 72 at bats, hitting just .208. His arm is strong enough to play right field, where when pitching his fastball sits in the low 90s. He needs to work on a third pitch if he wants to work as a starter.

9. Delvin Perez SS (Cardinals) - Delvin was a first round pick of the Cardinals in 2016, despite rumors that he had failed a drug test prior to the draft. Perez dominated in the Puerto Rican leagues. Once arriving in the major leagues his bat has grown silent, with just two homeruns in four years. Myworld kept him on the list because he did make the All Star team in Low A last year and the tools are there for him to play short. He needs to raise that .317 slugging percentage and lower his 24 errors to have a chance at the major leagues.

10. Jose DeLeon RHP (Reds) - Jose was drafted in the 24th round of the 2013 draft. While with the Dodgers he was considered a top prospect. The Dodgers traded him to the Rays in 2017 for Logan Forsythe and then the injuries happened. Despite being major league ready injuries limited DeLeon to one major league appearance in 2017. Tommy John surgery in 2018 kept him out of action that year. He rebounded in 2019 with 15 starts and three major league appearances. He struck out 73 in 51 AAA innings. After the year ended the Rays traded him to the Reds where he hopes to squeeze himself onto the major league roster. At 27 years of age he doesn’t have that much more time to make prospect lists.

NL Central Predictions

Saturday, March 14th, 2020

With the baseball season postponed myworld has more time to provide our predictions for the 2020 season. But why delay. This is the toughest division to predict because there are four teams that will be battling for the first spot. The only team to be left out of the dance - the Pirates.

1. St. Louis Cardinals

Good- When we look at teams we always look at the starting pitching. The Cardinals may not have the best starting pitching, but they have a lot of depth to get through injuries. John Flaherty could turn into an ace but at 24 it may be too early to lay that mantle on him. His numbers last year, especially in the second half were ace like. There is a solid group behind him in Adam Wainwright, Dakota Hudson and Miles Mikolas. Korean newcomer Kwang-Hyun Kim was an ace in Korea, but in St. Louis he will only have to fill the five hole. Myworld likes Carlos Martinez better in the bullpen where he can replace John Hicks as the closer and also stay healthy, but when Hicks returns he can always be moved into the rotation. Paul DeJong has silently turned himself into a quality shortstop that hits 30 plus homeruns and plays quality defense. All he needs to do is reduce his strikeouts and improve his average. Paul Goldschmidt and Yadier Molina provide veteran leadership even if there numbers are falling.

Bad - With John Hicks not available for the start of the season the bullpen would be better off with Carlos Martinez as the closer. Andrew Miller has struggled the last two years and can not be trusted with protecting leads. Kolton Wong is a quality defensive player but does not provide the lineup with a lot of offense. Matt Carpenter needs to hit to get into the lineup and it would be more potent with him at third and Tommy Edman at second. Last year he had multiple nagging injuries that kept him out of the lineup and may have impacted his swing.

Ugly - Alex Reyes and Carlos Martinez were supposed to be ace 1 and 1a when they were coming up as prospects. Neither have been able to stay healthy to compete in the rotation. Carlos has had some success, especially out of the bullpen. Injuries and suspensions have prevented Alex from pitching 100 innings since 2016. The Cardinals will see how he fits out of the bullpen. He has the velocity to be a closer, but not the experience.

Rookies - Dylan Carlson could win the centerfield spot. He hits for big time power and will combine with Tyler O’Neil to make for a young and promising outfield. Genesis Cabrera may start in the bullpen but he can also be used in the rotation. His left handed arm has lots of velocity but finding the plate has been a challenge.

Expected Finish - It will be a battle to the finish, but the Cardinals will prevail with the top spot.

2. Milwaukee Brewers

Good - The outfield is extremely talented, moving Ryan Braun to first base. Christian Yelich should recover from his knee injury to provide MVP numbers again. Lorenzo Cain does not put up gaudy numbers but he steals bases, plays solid defense in centerfield and usually hits in the .300 neighborhood. Last year was an off year. Avisail Garcia was a free agent signing who will put together a solid offense but has a habit of missing 20 to 30 games each season because of injuries. That is where Ryan Braun can come in handy to play outfield. Keston Hiura is a hitting machine at second base. His defense may be spotty but his bat will drive in runs.

Bad - Left side of the infield will be short on offense. Orlando Arcia may pop some homeruns but he has a .292 career OBA and .652 OPS. Mike Moustakas departure leaves a hole at third. They would like to see Jedd Gyorko find his bat that he seemed to have lost last year. If Braun moves to the outfield their first base options are limited. Justin Smoak and his 2017 season of 38 homeruns seem to be an outlier and Ryan Healy has had two poor seasons back to back. The starting pitching is questionable after Brandon Woodruff. Josh Lindblom comes from Korea where he was the top pitcher there. He hopes that translates to success in the major leagues. Too many pitchers better suited for the back end of the rotation appear to be slotted in the two and three hole.

Ugly - Christian Yelich needs to stay healthy. If he gets injured this lineup looks ugly, lacking any power. Ryan Braun is getting older, Omar Narvaez showed some pop last year behind the plate, but bats that can consistently hit 30 plus homeruns are absent from this roster. Disaster could strike the rotation if Woodruff goes down. No reliable ace in the rotation and not a lot in the minors. Myworld and many others have rated the Brewers minor league system the worst in baseball. That will hurt when depth is needed to accommodate injuries.

Rookies - Myworld rated this farm system the worst in the major leagues. There may be some players who can squeeze their name on the roster, but making an impact is another story.

Expected Finish - It all depends on the health of Christian Yelich. If he plays 145 plus games a wild card finish is possible.

3. Cincinnati Reds

Good - There top position is the infield where Eugenio Suarez and Mike Moustakas give them two players with 30 plus homerun power. Moustakas is better defensively at third but his offense will make up for any defensive inefficiencies. Joey Votto needs to have a better season than last year if the Reds want to compete. The outfield has a lot of depth but lacks power. Free agent signings Shogo Akiyama from Japan and Nick Castellanos from the Cubs created the crowded outfield. The key to its success could be the production of Nick Senzel, but he could also move to second base. The top three in the rotation (Luis Castillo, Sonny Gray and Trevor Bauer) need to be good for this team to compete. They have the potential but they have also had their bad years. Which Jekyll and Hyde shows up will define the Reds season.

Bad - Tucker Barnhart is a solid catcher but he does not provide much offensively. Tyler Stephenson is probably a year away from making his debut. Raisel Iglesias had a career high 34 saves but his ERA was almost two runs higher than his previous two seasons. Amir Garrett is not proven but if Iglesias continues to struggle he could take over. The back of the rotation will need a good bullpen to win games.

Ugly - The Reds have built this team to contend. Sonny Gray and Trevor Bauer have had some horrendous years, Bauer struggling last year. They need those two to pitch to their potential if they hope to stay in it. Joey Votto has to have a better year and it would be nice if Aristedes Aquino could hit like he did when first called up last year than the Aquino of September who hit just .196. Nick Senzel also needs to show his potential. Myworld sees an easy scenario where it all goes bad and the hopes for 2020 crash.

Rookies - It would be tough to see Tyler Stephenson get in the lineup after only finishing AA last year. Catchers need more time to develop. He could be called up mid-season if Barnhart has a long term injury and Tyler is tearing it up in AAA. Shogo Akiyama is technically a rookie, even though he has had a lot of success in Japan. The Reds hope to utilize him best as a fourth outfielder, unless his bat makes him too valuable to leave him out of the lineup.

Expected Finish - Out of the wild card race and in third place.

4. Chicago Cubs

Good - They still have a strong base of hitters in Javier Baez, Kris Bryant, Anthony Rizzo and Wilson Contreras. These players are getting older while no young arms have been able to work themselves in the rotation. If the Cubs trade one it may be a sign of rebuilding. Kyle Schwarber is a power bat that provides suspect defense in left field. His 38 homeruns last year were a career high and his average keeps on rising with each year. Javier Baez moving from second to short gives rookie Nico Hoerner an opportunity to win the second base job. Another top bat finding its way into the lineup.

Bad - They need to get more from their free agent pitchers Jon Lester and Yu Darvish. The Cubs would probably like a mulligan on the Jose Quintana for Eloy Jimenez trade. Jose has turned into a borderline fifth rotation piece. The outfield appears a bit unsettled. Jason Heyward always seems to underperform, though his 21 dingers last year were his most since 2012. Despite being a first round pick, Ian Happ has not established himself as a quality major league hitter. He hopes to win the centerfield job over Albert Almora, who has a good glove but quiet bat. Craig Kimbrel was a disaster in the bullpen last year. He hoped to have a full spring training to get ready this year, but now the corona virus has put a stop to spring training. If the Cubs want to compete he needs to have a better year or find another closer.

Ugly - The Cubs development of pitching. It means they have to sign expensive free agents, or trade good, young talent for veteran pitchers who have a limited number of bullets left in their arm. Since the arrival of Theo Epstein they have not drafted a pitcher that has made an impact on the major league roster. They have drafted a number of bats that have gotten them to the playoffs but the arms have remained absent from the rotation.

Rookies - Nico Hoerner could win the second base job. His primary position is shortstop but Javier Baez seems to have that position covered now. Nico should hit for a decent average but may lack the over the fence power. Most of their other young players are down in the lower minors, including Brailyn Marquez, who was signed in 2015 out of the Dominican Republic. He probably won’t be ready until 2021, unless the Cubs become desperate and he is dominating.

Expected Finish - not enough pitching to get anything but fourth place.

5. Pittsburgh Pirates

Good - Brian Reynolds had a good rookie year last season, hitting .314 with 16 homeruns. If he was a veteran he would have been traded by now but the Pirates will try to build around him. Josh Bell appeared to reach his potential last year with 37 homeruns and 116 RBIs. He plays first base. Left field and first base are not where championship teams are formed, but it’s a start.

Bad - Gregory Polanco had a forgettable year and Jarrod Dyson is more a fourth outfielder type, but each will form two thirds of the Pirates outfield. Austin Meadows would sure look nice here but see ugly for why he is not here. The middle of the field is filled with backups and second tier players. Kevin Newman at short may be there only true quality player up the middle. Jacob Stallings may be best as a backup catcher, Adam Frazier is a utility player and Dyson is a fourth outfielder type. As stated, championship clubs are developed by the quality up the middle.

Ugly - The Pirates hope Chris Archer becomes their ace, recovering from his down year last year. The Pirates traded Austin Meadows (.291, 33 homeruns) and Tyler Glasnow (6-1, 1.78) to Tampa Bay for Archer. Shane Baz, a top prospect in the minors was also sent to the Rays. They made the trade when they thought they were competing. Shortly after that the Pirates went into rebuilding mode. Meadows and Glasnow would look nice on any rebuilding club or could fetch a pretty penny if traded.

Rookies - The Pirates have waited a long time for Mitch Keller to arrive in the major leagues. He appears to have regressed since his early days in the minors. The fastball is still there but his pitches are more hittable. Ke’Bryan Hayes plays a gold glove defense but his bat is short of expectations for the corner. It would take an injury to Colin Moran, trade or a complete collapse before Hayes takes over the third base job this year. The Pirates are very patient with their rookies, valuing service time. Kevin Kramer could win a job at utility but he needs to beat the better bat in Cole Tucker.

Expected Finish - Last place and perhaps the worst record in the National League. For the Pirates it may be best for the corona virus to shorten the length of the season.

Top Prospects from Mexico

Tuesday, March 10th, 2020

The graduating class from last year’s list include Alex Verdugo, the number one prospect and Luis Urias, who was at number three. Four players were dropped from last year’s list (Florencio Serrano, Luis Verdugo, Jose Albertos and Reivaj Garcia). Serrano was ranked as the number two prospect last year based on the wild invalid signing issues by the Cubs allowing him to slip to the Rangers as an international signing prospect for $1.5 million. He then bombed in his first season in rookie ball with a 6.49 ERA. Myworld will wait another year before ranking him in our top ten. That leaves six new names to propagate this year’s list. Below are the 2020 top ten prospects from Mexico playing in the minor leagues.

1. Andres Munoz RHP (Padres) - He moved up from number six last year. The fastball is quite impressive, hitting triple digits pretty consistently. It got him 22 appearances with the Padres last year in the bullpen. He is expected to compete for their closer job this year. In AA he struck out 18.4 hitters per nine innings. In the major leagues it dropped to 11.7. While his fastball is impressive, his second pitch, the slider is just a show me pitch to keep hitters from sitting on the fastball. He also has issues finding the plate and staying healthy for a full season. So the bullpen is where he stays. In his minor league career he has given up 69 hits in 106 innings and walked 65.

2. Alejandro Kirk C (Blue Jays) - Last year Kirk did not appear on this list even after he hit .354 with 10 homeruns and a 1.001 OPS in rookie ball. For the 2019 season he split his time between Low A and High A where he combined for a .290 average with seven homeruns. At 5′9″ and 220 he doesn’t have the body to impress scouts, but he makes consistent contact with the ball, resulting in a 89/60 walk to whiff ratio. His power will probably be restricted more to the gaps and his lack of speed will prevent him from taking the extra base. So far, he has not shown a lot defensively and may have to move from the catcher spot, with DH and first base his only real alternatives. Kirk may lack the power to play first base. So the Blue Jays will keep him at catcher and hope his weight stays in check and his defensive skills progress as he rises up the minor league ranks.

3. Jose Urquidy RHP (Astros) - Jose also rose from the ranks of the non-existent. Myworld watched him pitch in a playoff game against the Nationals. His stuff is not impressive, but he gets hitters out. He stands only 6′0″ and his fastball sits in the low 90s, but he can tip the mid-90s with a little effort. His excellent changeup and the command he shows with his pitches is what gets hitters out. In the minor leagues opponents were able to hit .248 off him, but Jose limited the runners from scoring by limiting his walks and whiffing 9.8 hitters per nine innings. Next year he will fit at the back end of the Astros rotation. Whether major league hitters can figure him out in his second year will determine his staying power.

4. Isaac Paredes 2B/3B (Tigers) - Isaac was rated fourth last year and he remains in that position this year. He started as a shortstop, but like Kirk his 5′11, 225 pound frame makes it tough for him to stay at that position. His hit tool is impressive, with a .274 minor league average and his power could develop. Last year he hit 13 homeruns with a .416 slugging percentage. That will fall short if he wants to fit into a corner slot. His defense at second may remind people more of Carlos Baerga. It will be his bat that will put him in the lineup. His best bet may be to make it as a utility player, with the possibility to even add left field to his defensive repertoire.

5. Gerardo Carrillo RHP (Dodgers) - Gerardo moved up four spots from the ninth position he occupied last year. At 6′1″ Gerardo is not a big man on the mound, but his fastball can cross the plate in the mid-90s, with lots of movement. Last year he struck out a hitter per inning. Developing his secondary pitches and finding the plate are his next challenges. Last year he walked 51 hitters in 86 innings and plunked 17. That wildness alone can send a message. His cutter is his most developed secondary pitch. Last year he pitched in High A and his 5.44 ERA and .263 opponents average told the tale of a year of struggle.

6. Tirso Ornelas OF (Padres) - He was the 10th rated prospect last year and his 2019 season may have been worse. He struggled to hit for average (.217) and his slugging percentage was below .300. The Padres paid $1.5 million on the talent they saw in Tirso. At 6′3″ he has impressive height but his swing is slow, not allowing him to catch up on fastballs. There is the potential for good plate discipline and a tinge of power, but that won’t develop until he speeds up his swing. His speed is a little above average, not enough to play centerfield and his below average arm may be a better fit for left field. This will put more pressure on him to develop that power that won’t be seen unless he can quicken his swing.

7. Victor Gonzalez LHP (Dodgers) - The last six guys on this list are all borderline prospects. Victor makes it because he throws lefthanded and his fastball sits in the mid-90s. The secondary pitches sit average at best but need a lot of work if he does not want hitters sitting on his fastball. Last year he rose up three levels, finishing the season at AAA. At each level he rose he got easier to hit, going from a .174 opposition average at High A to a .286 at AAA. He does throw strikes but he needs to improve his secondary pitches if he hopes to have success against major leaguers.

8. Ramon Urias 2B (Orioles) - When myworld first started working on this list Ramon was a Cardinal. He was placed on waivers and the Orioles picked him up. He was originally signed by the Rangers in 2010 but he returned to the Mexican League to play there during the 2013 season. The Cardinals then picked him up in 2018. He has a decent hit tool with limited power that could get him into the double digits in homeruns. His defense will not overwhelm you, but as a hitter he could end up fitting as a utility player. Last year he reached AAA, hitting .263 with 9 homeruns and a .793 OPS.

9. Aldo Ramirez RHP (Red Sox) - Aldo throws a vanilla mix. His fastball sits in the low 90s but can travel in the mid-90s on occasion. His curve and change give him three average pitches. The Red Sox signed him in 2018 and last year he made his minor league debut, stitching together a 3.94 ERA in 13 starts and one relief appearance. Opponents hit him at a .245 clip but he did strike out more than a hitter an inning. He turns 19 in May so he has plenty of time to develop. At only 6′0 at best he will fit in the back of the rotation or be used in middle relief.

10. Manuel Rodriguez RHP (Cubs) - Manuel does not reach 6′0″ but his fastball sits in the mid-90s and he can reach the upper 90s. The Cubs signed him in 2016 for $400,000. All of his minor league appearances have been in the bullpen. His secondary pitches are average or below, which will keep him in the bullpen. Last year he improved his command, throwing more strikes and the opposition average went from .308 to .242. He won’t be anything more than a situational reliever that is used to get right handed hitters out.

NL West Predictions

Sunday, March 8th, 2020

We start out west with the National League. This is a pretty obvious race to predict the winner.

1. Los Angeles Dodgers

Good - The acquisition of Mookie Betts transformed this outfield into one of the best in baseball. Mookie and Cody Bellinger combine both offense and defense and are probably 1-2 in the National League as far as top outfielders. Joc Pederson and A.J. Pollock will form a solid platoon in left. The infielders have no slackers either with Max Muncy, Justin Turner and Corey Seager combining for 92 homeruns last year. The open spot will be filled by super rookie Gavin Lux at second base. The starting pitching does not have as much depth as last year but Clayton Kershaw and Walker Buehler make a good one two punch.

Bad - Not a lot to find here. The relief pitching appears a little spotty. Kenley Jensen had an off year last year and the Dodgers are relying on retreads Joe Kelly and Blake Treinen to set up for him if he struggles. This will mean they will have to pitch better than last year.

Ugly - Nothing ugly about this team, but it could get ugly if the Dodgers under perform and fail to win 100 games.

Rookies - Gavin Lux is a strong favorite to win rookie of the year with his play at second base. He can also play short if something should happen to Seager. Also, keeping the glove of Max Muncy away from second base improves the defense. The lack of depth in the rotation with the departures of Kenta Maeda and Hyun-Jin Ryu will give Dustin May an opportunity to start. He pitched mostly in relief last year but did get four starts. Will Smith would have to be injured before Keibert Ruiz would be given an opportunity to catch. With a good spring Tony Gonsolin could work himself in the rotation. He could begin the season in the bullpen.

Expected Finish - If they don’t win this division it may be one of the biggest shocks in baseball. They should win it by at least 20 games.

2. Arizona Diamondbacks

Good - The acquisition of Starling Marte gives them a strong outfield with David Peralta and free agent acquisition Kole Calhoun surrounding him at the corners. It also allows Ketel Marte to move to second and Eduardo Escobar to play third, strengthening those two positions. Those five have the potential to combine for 150 homeruns. The big question marks are Ketel Marte replicating his break out 2019 season and Peralta staying healthy. Nick Ahmed shows he can play defense with any shortstop, but his bat is a little soft.

Bad - The acquisition of Madison Bumgarner would be good if it had been done four years ago. He has hit 30 and it has been since 2016 when he last had a good season. Maybe he can find the Justin Verlander juice and resurrect his career in a new city. Robbie Ray, who starts behind him in the number two spot has seen his numbers drop, including the velocity on his fastball. Not really sold on Christian Walker, though he did outperform Paul Goldschmidt last year, the player he replaced at first base.

Ugly - Couldn’t find anything ugly here other than being in the same division as the Dodgers.

Rookies - If Jon Duplantier can avoid injury he could squeeze himself into this rotation by mid-season. Last year he struggled finding the plate resulting in a 5.21 ERA in AAA. Josh Rojas could win a job in a utility roles. Rojas was the player that almost sunk the Justin Verlander trade when Jeff Luhnow thought it was a big ask by the Diamondbacks to add him as a third player in the trade.

Expected Finish - Second place, but out of the wild card race.

3. Colorado Rockies

Good - They have an MVP over at third base in Nolan Arenado. The Rockies were looking to trade him so if that happens this position would drop. If Trevor Story can stay healthy the left side of the infield would be exceptional.

Bad - Daniel Murphy has just lost too much in the bat to fit at first base. His defense there also does not justify him playing the position. No real alternatives except possibly moving Ryan McMahon there. David Dahl needs to stay healthy and Raimel Tapia needs to find the bat that hit over .300 in the minor leagues. They will be battling the over paid Ian Desmond for one of two outfield spots. Charlie Blackmon is not the outfielder he used to be, but he was good enough to hit 30 plus homeruns last year.

Ugly - The pitching. There is no ace in the rotation or closer in the bullpen. They need to find bounce back years from German Marquez and Kyle Freeland. Wade Davis couldn’t get anyone out last year (8.65 ERA). Getting the three to put up 2018 numbers would help in crafting more wins. It will be a battle in the spring to find the closer.

Rookies - Brendan Rodgers shoulder injury will prevent him from playing until mid-season. He seems to be blocked at all the infield positions. Sam Hilliard does not have to do much but bash 30 plus homeruns to win the left field job. He needs to improve his ability to make contact.

Expected Finish - The starting pitching will have to make a big turn around to finish anything higher than third place.

4. San Diego Padres

Good - They got one of the strongest left sides in baseball in Fernando Tatis Jr. and Manny Machado. Tatis needs to stay healthy and Machado needs to improve his numbers in a pitcher’s park. Machado has hit 30 plus homeruns in his last five seasons but last year was the second year of those five when he slugged less than .500. Chris Paddack has ace like potential and the Padres have some young hurlers like McKenzie Gore and Luis Patino who may improve the rotation toward the end of the year. Kirby Yates is a solid closer. The Padres may trade him before the trade deadline to acquire more prospects, leaving the recently acquired Emilio Pagan as the closer. Both are solid in the bullpen.

Bad - The starting rotation after Paddock is very vanilla and will give up a lot of runs. Short outings may tax what is a good bullpen, leaving them tired and performing below expectations. Eventually the youngsters will filter in and that will result in inconsistency. The potential for this starting rotation is good, but they are still a year or two away. The hope is Jurickson Profar can replicate his 2018 season when he hit .254 with 20 homeruns. He hit 20 homeruns last year but his batting average sunk to .218. Veteran Brian Dozier was acquired to fill the position in case Profar struggled, but his best days are behind him.

Ugly - Putting Josh Naylor out in left field. His best position is DH, though he might be able to be passable at first. Putting him out into the outfield is an impending disaster. Fortunately for the Padres they have a lot of depth in the outfield, but the Padres would like to find a spot for Naylor’s bat.

Rookie - They have three pitchers who could see significant time in the starting rotation in MacKenzie Gore, Luis Patino and Adrian Morejon. None of them will probably be up before June. Both Michel Baez and Andres Munoz have closer stuff and may break camp in the Padres bullpen. Jake Cronenworth is a possible two way/utility player. His primary position is short but he can play multiple positions, including pitch, with a fastball that reaches the mid-90s.

Expected Finish - Their farm system is one of the best in baseball, but the talent is still a year or two away from competing for a playoff spot.

San Francisco Giants

Good - They really have no good in this lineup. Buster Posey, Evan Longoria and Brandon Crawford were once good in their prime but now they are just average, waiting for their replacement to rise up and fill their position in a couple years. In the meantime they will produce average numbers.

Bad - As usual the outfield lacks any big names. It would be asking a lot to have Mike Yastrzemski put up similar numbers to last year. His name is the biggest name, but it is only because his grandfather is Carl. The corners could be rotated a lot with Jaylin Davis being given an opportunity. Last year Jaylin hit 35 homeruns in the minor leagues and he added one in the majors. The bullpen lacks a closer. They will turn to Tony Watson and if he fails it could become bullpen by committee.

Ugly - With the departure of Madison Bumgarner the Giants rotation lacks an ace. Johnny Cueto is coming off injury, Jeff Samardzija is just a year away from a 6.25 ERA and Kevin Gausman has never met his potential. Before the season ends you could see 10 or more different arms trying to salvage this rotation.

Rookies - Joey Bart is having a good spring and is ready to replace Buster Posey. Posey could move to first, but his anemic bat no longer supports that position. This could move Brandon Belt to the outfield, weakening the defense. Mauricio Dubon is battling for the second base job. Last year he became the first Honduran to play major league baseball. Jaylin Davis could squeeze his 35 homeruns into a fluid outfield.

Expected Finish - Not quite catching the Padres, so last in the division.

Major League Farm Rankings - 5 - 1

Wednesday, March 4th, 2020

Myworld saved the best for last. The top five farm teams. Unfortunately for all these teams you had to tank a few seasons to get here. Time will tell whether it was worth it.

5. Detroit Tigers (27.68)

The pitching in the minors may be the best in baseball. It all starts with Casey Mize, the first pick in the 2018 draft. Shoulder issues last year created an early ending to his season, which is a cause of concern. Matt Manning, the Tigers first round pick in 2016 was the top pitcher in the organization until Mize was picked. Tarik Skubal seemed to come out of nowhere to have a special season. You look at his minor league track record and it is impressive for a ninth round pick (2018). He is the one lefthander in the group. Outfielder Riley Greene was their first round pick in 2019. He is tearing it up this spring, already with two homeruns as a 19 year old. His defense will limit him to left field. Isaac Paredes was signed out of Mexico in 2015 and is listed at shortstop. His bat will get him in the lineup, but it will probably be either at third, second or as a utility player. The range isn’t there to stay at shortstop.

Alex Faedo and Franklin Perez are two other top of the line pitchers who could complete the five man rotation. Faedo was a first round pick in 2017 and Perez was acquired from Houston. He has battled injuries the last two seasons, limiting him to just 9 starts and 27 innings. Parker Meadows is the brother of Austin and was the Tigers second round pick in 2018. At 6′5″ he carries some power in his bat. Roberto Campos is another outfielder to watch. He was signed out of Cuba in 2019 for $2.85 million and will make his debut in 2020. Adinso Reyes is a middle infielder the Tigers signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2018 for $1.45 million. He hit .331 with a .508 slugging percentage in the Dominican Summer League, good numbers if he can stay at short. Jose dela Cruz is an outfielder that they also signed out of the Dominican Republic for $1.85 million in 2018. He hit .307 with 11 homeruns, a .556 slugging percentage and 16 stolen bases in Rookie ball as a 17 year old. He currently has centerfield speed.

4. Seattle Mariners (28.59)

Jarred Kelenic was a first round pick of the Mets in 2018. They traded him to the Mariners in the Robinson Cano/Edwin Diaz deal. Kelenic has five tool potential, with centerfield speed and middle of the order power potential. Julio Rodriguez is a Dominican who the Mariners signed in 2017 for $1.75 million. He does not have the speed of Kelenic, but his power will be special. Logan Gilbert was the Mariners first round pick in 2018 who has already pitched himself to AA. He could make his major league debut sometime by mid-season in 2020. Evan White recently signed a long term contract. The 2017 first round pick is a defensive wiz at first base who will hit but may be a bit short in power for a typical first baseman. Noelvi Marte was signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2018 for $1.55 million. His hit tool including his power is more impressive than his glove at short at this point. Justin Dunn was another Mets first round pick (2016) they traded to the Mariners in the Cano/Diaz deal. He made his major league debut last year and will be competing for a rotation spot this year. Justus Sheffield was a first round pick of the Yankees in 2014 but sent to the Mariners in the James Paxton trade. The lefthander has ace like tools if he can enhance his command. Kyle Lewis was the Mariners first round pick in 2016. He appears fully recovered from his gruesome knee injury in 2016 and is poised to take over one of the corner outfield spots. George Kirby was the Mariners first round pick in 2019 and made a good debut last year, not walking a hitter in 23 innings, a 0/25 walk to whiff ratio.

We named a lot of prospects in the Top 100, which fill their top ten prospect list. Brandon Williamson was a second round pick in 2019. The lefthander has a good fastball that got 14.7 whiffs per 9 innings in his minor league debut.

3. Chicago White Sox (31.34)

Luis Robert was the second best prospect after Wander Franco. The Cuban outfielder signed a $26 million bonus in 2017. Last year he had a break out season with 32 homeruns after going homerless in 2018. Andrew Vaughn was the first pick in the 2019 draft. His right handed swing is sweet and should live in the .300 neighborhood. He could rise quickly and reach the major leagues in 2021. Michael Kopech was the hardest thrower in the minor leagues two years ago but Tommy John surgery forced him to sit out the 2019 season. Command is still a question with him. Nick Madrigal led Oregon State to the College World Series championship in 2018, with the White Sox rewarding him by making him a first round pick in 2018. He will be an excellent defensive second baseman who makes consistent contact, but his bat may lack power.

Matthew Thompson is a second round 2019 pick to be watched. He throws in the mid-90s and has a full array of pitches, impressive for a high schooler. Yolbert Sanchez was signed out of Cuba in 2019. He was a teammate of Luis Robert on Cuba’s Under-18 World Cup team. At 22 the White Sox will move him quickly. His hit tool is ahead of his glove and he may eventually have to move from short to second.

2. San Diego Padres (31.92)

MacKenzie Gore was the Padres first round pick in 2017. The lefthander currently could be the best pitching prospect in the minor leagues. Luis Patino throws from the opposite side. He was signed out of Colombia for just $130,000 but his 6′0″ frame can zip the fastball across the plate in the high 90s. CJ Abrams was the Padres 2019 first round pick. Speed is his tool but he hit .401 in his 32 game debut in rookie ball. Taylor Trammell was a first round supplemental pick of the Reds in 2016, winning the MVP in the Futures Game in 2018. He was sent to the Padres in the three team trade with the Indians to acquire Trevor Bauer. Luis Campusano will be a premium catcher with good offensive and defensive tools. He was the Padres second round pick in 2017. Adrian Morejon is a lefthanded pitcher the Padres signed out of Cuba in 2016 for $11 million. He was voted the MVP of the 15 and Under World Cup, defeating the United States in the gold medal game with a complete game victory.

Gabriel Arias has a smooth glove that could win gold. He also brings a decent bat to the plate. The Padres signed him for $1.9 million in 2016 out of Venezuela. Last year he made his debut in the .300 neighborhood (.302) at High A, slugging 17 homeruns. Reggie Preciado was signed for $1.3 million out of Panama in 2019. His bat is ahead of his glove and his slow foot speed may require a move from shortstop to third base. Ismael Mena was signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2019 for $2.2 million. He has excellent speed with a 6′3″ frame that could hit for power.

1. Tampa Bay Rays (32)

Not only will they make the playoffs, but their farm system is brimming with prospects that could help with their playoff roster. Wander Franco is the top prospect in baseball. He could become a superstar shortstop. Brendan McKay was noted more for his bat than his glove in college, the Rays rewarding him by making him the first round pick in 2017. His arm is what got him to the majors last year. He needs to improve with the bat if the Rays hope to use him as a two way player. Vidal Brujan has a small frame but the legs have the speed to steal 40 plus bases. He won’t hit for a lot of power. Xavier Edwards is the third shortstop prospect on this list. He may have the best glove of this group and will hit in the neighborhood of .300 with very little power. He was a 2018 first round supplemental pick of the Padres who sent him to the Rays in the Tommy Pham trade. Brent Honeywell has not pitched the last two seasons because of two separate arm injuries. The 2014 second round supplemental pick was supposed to follow Blake Snell in the rotation before the injuries shelved his climb. Shane Baz is a first round 2017 pick with a fastball that can hit triple digits. Josh Lowe is the brother of Nate. The 2016 first round pick had a break out power season last year with 18 homeruns. He still must improve on his contact issues. Greg Jones was the Rays first round pick in 2019 who hit .335 in his minor league debut. Speed is his main attribute, which may move him from short to center. Shane McClanahan is a 2018 first round pick who can hit the radar in triple digits, excellent for a lefthander. Yoshitomo Tsutugo was signed out of Japan. He had 40 homerun seasons there but can be a defensive liability. Joe Ryan was a seventh round 2018 pick who had a fabulous season last year, striking out more than 14 hitters per nine innings last season.

Ronaldo Hernandez is a catcher out of Colombia who has both a good glove and bat. His arm is a rifle and will control the running game. The Rays parted with $1.5 million to sign Jhon Diaz in 2019. He has a small frame with above average grades in all areas but power.

AL East Predictions

Sunday, March 1st, 2020

They may have to take a back seat to the AL West as far as quality of teams after the Red Sox trade of Mookie Betts turns the Red Sox into average.

Tampa Bay Rays

Good - They always seem to have depth in their starting rotation. A free agent leaves or a pitcher gets traded another fills in behind him. Blake Snell is the ace, but there is some health concern with his elbow this year. Tyler Glasnow put up some ace like numbers in his 12 starts so he could fill in behind Snell. Charlie Morton is the veteran that will most likely roll as the ace if Snell goes down. The back end of the rotation could be filled by Brendan McKay, Brent Honeywell and/or Ryan Yarbrough. Yarbrough was often the second pitcher to pitch the bulk of the innings in an opener situation, but the Rays could have enough starters not to need the opener. Honeywell may not be available until mid-season. The corner outfielders could generate some power with Hunter Renfroe and Austin Meadows. Each hit over 30 homeruns last year. Randy Arozarena could be up by mid-season to provide some power in center. Japanese import Yoshitomo Tsutsugo is a third power source, but he could see most of his at bats at third base or DH.

Bad - Infield is a bit vanilla, especially the corners with Ji-Man Choi and Yandy Diaz. Diaz did show some power last year, but they may be better offensively at the corners with Tsutsugo and Jose Martinez, though the defense may suffer. Nate Lowe could provide some interesting pop at first base. Willy Adames needs to make more contact but is solid at short and the second base job belongs to Brandon Lowe, if he can stay healthy. The catching position will not generate much offense. Mike Zunino can hit for power but he struggles to stay above the Mendoza line. The bullpen lacks a closer. The man with the best stuff maybe Colin Poche, but he seems susceptible to the long ball.

Ugly - They are the definition of small market. The budget is tight so going out to get needs is not possible unless you are seeking a bargain. So while the Dodgers trade for Mookie Betts the best the Rays can hope for is Jose Martinez. This could become critical as they battle down to the wire with the Yankees.

Rookies - If Brandan McKay has a good spring he could be in the rotation right out of the gate. Brent Honeywell will have to wait until mid-season since he hasn’t really pitched in two years and needs to get starts in the minors. Yoshitomo Tsutsugo is technically a rookie, though he has had 40 homerun campaigns in Japan. Randy Arozarena should be the centerfielder by mid-season. Don’t expect to see number one prospect Wander Franco until 2021.

Predicted Finish - They will battle it out with the Yankees for the top spot.

New York Yankees

Good - There is a lot of power in the bats of Aaron Judge, Gleyber Torres, Giancarlo Stanton, Miguel Andujar and Gary Sanchez if they can stay healthy. Except for Torres and Sanchez that has been an issue. Signing Gerritt Cole gives them a true ace. D.J. LeMahieu and Gio Urshela may not have the power of the other bats in the lineup, but they are just solid ballplayers who play good defense and provide critical offense. Aroldis Chapman can still hit triple digits with his fastball and if he falters Zack Britton can step in to be the closer. The bullpen should hold a lot of leads after the seventh inning. Lots of depth on this team to cover the different positions. Finding at bats for them will be a challenge unless injuries create the opportunities.

Bad - The outfield will be a little thin without Judge and Stanton. Because of their fragility the manager may have to find them a lot of rest if they are healthy. Brett Gardner is not really a centerfielder so that will be a defensive liability until Aaron Hicks returns, but that is not certain. The starting pitching depth has been dealt a blow with the early injuries to Luis Severino and James Paxton. Paxton should be back by mid-season and Domingo German will be a shot in the arm when he returns from the restricted list.

Ugly - The injuries. The Yankees won last year despite all their injuries. Those injuries are taking their toll again. Perhaps it is the large contracts and the sense of comfort with these large contracts that don’t make the players work as hard as they need to in order to stay in shape. They have depth in their starting lineup to deal with some of these injuries, but it will be hard for the pitching staff to replace the loss of veteran starters.

Rookies - Despite being a veteran team, the injuries have created a depth problem in the starting rotation. This could provide an opportunity for Clarke Schmidt, Deivi Garcia, Michael King or Albert Abreu to fit in the rotation. Thairo Estrada could play a role as a utility player, though he may not see many games with infielders Urshela, Torres and LeMahieu all expected to play more than 150 games.

Expected Finish - Second Place, but qualifying for a wild card.

Boston Red Sox

Good - J.D. Martinez may be one of the better hitters in the league. If he was not such a liability on defense he could fill in at left field to make the outfield whole again. Rafael Devers is a hitting machine. His defense is a little iffy, but he will produce more runs with his bat than he will let in with his glove. That is all I have for the good.

Bad - Starting rotation is a little shallow. A lot depends on the results of Chris Sale. He has got to have a better year than last year. Even if he does bounce back the back end of the rotation appears horrid. Eduardo Rodriguez always seems so up and down and Nathan Eovaldi has not started 30 games since 2014. Martin Perez keeps getting second chances and failing to fulfill the promise. Second base will be a battle between Jose Peraza and Michael Chavis. Jose provides little offense and Chavis little defense at the position. Choose your poison. The bullpen lacks a proven closer though Brandon Workman provided 16 saves last year.

Ugly - The right field position. Trading an MVP candidate creates a giant hole in right field. Expecting Alex Verdugo to fill it, or even Kevin Pillar is asking a lot. It puts a lot of pressure on the other players to make up for the lost production. Myworld does not see a lot more increased production in this lineup. The trade of Betts was needed to stay under the salary cap. The Red Sox could have kept Betts and chosen to go over the salary cap, but they went the less costly route, which won’t result in victories in 2020.

Rookies - The farm system is slim but they have a power bat in Bobby Dalbec for third base if they want to move Devers to first to generate more offense. A lot will depend on the production of either Mitch Moreland or Chavis at first. Jarren Duran could be a mid-season callup if the outfield continues to seek help. He is a speed guy that will provide little power. Darwinzon Hernandez has the stuff to be a closer but he could also be asked to provide starts if the need should arise. He would make a perfect opener for a lineup loaded with lefties up front.

Expected Finish - Third Place and battling to stay over .500.

Toronto Blue Jays

Good - A lot will depend on the second year performances of Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Bo Bichette, Cavan Biggio and Lourdes Gurriel. If they produce this could be an exciting offense. Randall Grichuk hit over 30 homeruns. He could be the veteran to lead this team. Prior to this year his claim to fame was being drafted ahead of Mike Trout by the Angels when they made back to back first round picks.

Bad - There is a lot of uncertainty at a number of positions. Danny Jansen was supposed to be an offensive catcher but last year he hit only .207. If he can meet his hype that would help the position. Teoscar Hernandez provided some power in centerfield, but there was a lot of swing and miss at the position and his .230 average ended a lot of rallies. They are relying on Travis Shaw to fill the first base job, but he had a horrendous year last year hitting just .157. If he fails they could turn to the unproven Rowdy Tellez.

Ugly - The pitching, both starting and relieving looks like trouble. Ken Giles had success last year as the closer after they traded Robert Osuna, but the previous year he was a disaster. They don’t appear to have any arms that can build a bridge to get to him. The ace of their rotation is Hyun-Jin Ryu, who has had trouble staying healthy. He did start 29 games last year but he has yet to pitch 200 innings in his major league career. There is not a lot to like behind him unless Shun Yamaguchi resurrects the best of his NPB days. Expect to see Nate Pearson in this rotation if not at the start of the season no later than mid-season, if he can stay healthy.

Rookies - Nate Pearson should make this rotation with a good spring. The problem would be monitoring his innings. In his three minor league seasons he has thrown 123 innings, with 102 of those innings coming last year. Anthony Kay is another arm that can slide into this rotation by mid-season. Santiago Espinal could fill a utility role in the infield. The Blue Jays have waited a long time for the promise of Anthony Alford. He has yet to hit over .200 in his three brief major league callup, his career average sitting at .145 with a .218 slugging. The 2020 season could be his last opportunity to fulfill the promise in a Jays uniform.

Expected Finish - A decent offense will not overcome a porous pitching staff. Their best hope is to surpass the Red Sox for third place.

Baltimore Orioles

Good - They will perform so bad that they could again get the number one pick in the 2021 draft. They fell short last year and lost to the Detroti Tigers for the number one pick in 2020. Trey Mancini is their only All Star. He is a first baseman forced to play right field because of the contract of Chris Davis. Don’t really see John Means replicating his 2019 season. He seemed to come out of nowhere last season but if he does it will be a pleasant surprise. The Orioles will have plenty of youth to serve. They just hope some of it will be good. Hanser Alberto hit .305 last year, but only .238 versus righthanders. In a full season he will hit more righthanders or play only against lefthanders in a platoon.

Bad - Youth is not bad but it is unproven. Finding a position for Ryan Mountcastle will be a challenge. They need his offense but his glove and arm are a liability. The outfield has unproven commodities in Anthony Santander, Austin Hays, Cedric Mullins and Dwight Smith Jr. Chance Sisco once provided a lot of promise for behind the plate but his defense is not strong and he is more of a backup, as is starter Pedro Severino.

Ugly - Chris Davis has had two seasons hitting below .200. He wouldn’t even be on the roster if not for his hefty contract. He has hit three homeruns in spring training, but if he fails to hit it will be time to turn over the position to Mancini or Ryan Mountcastle. The starting pitching will be ugly and may be the worst in baseball. With a number of promising arms in the minor leagues the Orioles are turning to journeyman pitchers to fill out the rotation. John Means needs to repeat his 2019 season in order to prevent this from becoming a disaster.

Rookies - Ryan Mountcastle has the bat but lacks the glove. They need to find room for him in the lineup either at DH or first base. He was the MVP in AAA last year in the International League. Hunter Harvey could end up the closer before the season ends. That is a big if to stay healthy. If the Orioles had their wish they would trade current closer Mychal Givens for prospects before the trading deadline. Austin Hays is penciled in to be the centerfielder. His bat has been hot and cold the last three years. Yusniel Diaz may make an appearance. The Orioles have to show something for the Manny Machado trade. The Orioles will probably run through a lot of starting pitchers. That means Keegan Akin will get an opportunity along with Dillon Tate, Dean Kremer, Mike Baumann and Zac Louther. Service time issues could prevent the latter three from being called up.

Expected Finish - Last place and fighting the Tigers and Royals for that first round pick.

Top Ten Canadian Prospects

Saturday, February 29th, 2020

Many of last year’s top ten Canadian prospects graduated to the major leagues last year. The top four prospects, Vladimir Guerrero Jr, Mike Soroka, Tyler O’Neil and Josh Naylor all had impacts on their major league teams and are no longer considered rookies. Cal Quantrill, the number 6 prospect also pitched enough major league innings to no longer qualify for this top ten list. That leaves the pickings for this current top ten list very slim, with just three returners. There is no sure fire major leaguer among this list. It is possible we could have missed a player who lived in Canada long enough as a youth to qualify, but if we learn of him we’ll add him to the list for next year, like Abraham Toro..

1. Abraham Toro 3B (Astros) - Last year he did not make this list because we were not aware he was born in Canada. He may have been rated seventh on the list if we had known his origins last year. This year he was voted by Canadian baseball as the top Canadian player, which gave us a hint to look him up. He has some good offensive tools, hitting .306 in AA and then .424 in a 16 game AAA debut, which got him a promotion to Houston. He has Alex Bregman in his way at third, and his bat may not carry enough power to start at a corner infield spot. He did hit 19 homeruns last year, including two in the major leagues, so the power could be developing. Defensively he is a average to below average, so that will hinder him in his quest to start a third if his bat doesn’t develop. His best bet would be to earn a job as a bench player, perhaps playing some second base and left field.

2. Bo Naylor C (Indians) - He is the younger brother of Josh and possibly the best bet to win regular major league time. Josh weighs in at over 250 while Bo is a more svelte 190. The Indians drafted him in the first round of the 2018 draft. His bat shows decent gap power with 18 doubles and 10 triples and there was enough power to carry 11 balls over the fence. The 10 triples tells you he has decent speed for a catcher, more than his brother Bo who is trying to make it as an outfielder. His arm is strong and his defensive tools are strong enough to stay behind the plate. Next year he should see time in High A.

3. Adam Hall SS (Orioles) - Adam is more a defensive shortstop. The Orioles drafted him in the second round of the 2017 draft. His one big attribute is his speed which allowed him to steal 22 bases in 2018 and 33 in 2019. His bat has also been decent the last two years, hitting just a few points shy of .300 both years. The power is limited with slugging averages less than .400 and as he rises up the ranks those numbers could decrease. His best bet may be to make it as a utility player if the bat does not improve. His defense will play.

4. Jordan Balazovic RHP (Twins) - The Twins waited until the fifth round in 2016 to draft Jordan. His first two seasons did not light any fires to draw the scouts attention, but last year he had a breakout season, striking out more than 12 hitters per nine innings between Low A and High A. He also limited the opposition to a .193 average. The fastball sits in the low to mid 90s and he complements it with a quality slider and change. Next year will be key when he will face more advanced AA hitters.

5. Dasan Brown OF (Blue Jays) - Dasan was the first Canadian selected in the 2019 draft, the Blue Jays grabbing him in the third round. Speed and the ability to cover centerfield will be his game. His bat does not show a lot of power now, but he was one of the youngest players selected in the draft so it could develop as he matures. He has excellent bat speed. With his speed defensively he should cover a lot of ground in centerfield. Last year he hit just .222 in 14 Rookie league games. He may have to start the season in extended spring, get a few games of Rookie league ball in him and with success move on up to Low A.

6. Otto Lopez SS/2B (Blue Jays) - Otto was born in the Dominican Republic but his parents moved to Canada when he was young. He got his start playing ball in Canada before his dad moved him down to the Dominican where he felt he could get a better opportunity to be seen by major league scouts. The Blue Jays signed him for $60,000. Not much was thought of him until he hit .324 in Low A, winning the Midwest League batting title. Lopez is not flashy for shortstop so his best bet would be at second base or in a utility role.

7. Tristan Pompey OF (Marlins) - The younger brother of Dalton. Dalton may have the more impressive tools but injuries hurt his major league development time. Tristan was selected in the third round of the 2018 draft, much earlier than his brother Dalton who had to wait until the 16th round in 2010. Tristan has above average speed, but his arm is short and will limit him to left field. At 6′4″ he could develop some power in the bat to fit in left field. Last year he started the season in extended spring training, got a late callup and struggled with a .194 average in the Florida State League. His .271 slugging with no homeruns needs to improve.

8. Brandon Markland RHP (Royals) - Brandon was a player who never got drafted after a high school or college (Bryan College) career. It was only after he pitched in the Coastal Plain Independent League that he got some interest in a team from Australia, the Auckland Tuatara, who are actually a team from New Zealand that plays in the ABL. The Royals found his mid-90s fastball there getting Australian hitters out with ease. In his first season stateside he finished with a 0.46 ERA, getting lots of ground ball outs and limiting the opposition to a .162 average. He is probably destined for the bullpen because of his control issues and ability to only throw two quality two (fastball and slider). At 23 years of age he might have been a bit old for Low A.

9. Andy Yerzy 1b/C (Diamondbacks) - Yerzy was a second round pick of the Diamondbacks in 2016. Last year Andy split his time between catching and first base. His tools to stay behind the plate are limited. While he has a little bit of pop, his bat may not have enough to stay at first base. He struggled at High A, hitting just .104 in 33 games, resulting in a demotion back to Low A. He did hit six homeruns in Low A but his .220 average was 70 points lower than his 2018 average. The 2020 season will be a critical season where he needs to replicate the slugging numbers he put up in 2017 and 2018.

10. Adam Macko LHP (Mariners) - He was born in Slovakia and just missed making the European list. The Mariners drafted him in the seventh round of the 2019 draft. The other choice for this slot would be Demi Orimoloye, who is blessed with tools but has trouble making contact. Adam studied pitching in Slovakia by watching YouTube videos of David Price and Justin Verlander. He moved to Ireland where he played for a Little League team ironically named the Mariners and then moved to Alberta, Canada. He doesn’t throw hard, with a fastball that sits in the high 80s, but he relies on his breaking pitches and command to retire hitters. In Rookie ball he struck out 31 hitters in 21 innings and limited the opposition to a .224 average. As he climbs up the minor league ladder he will find better hitters who have the ability to hit breaking pitches if he lacks the command to throw them where they can’t be hit.

Major League Farm Rankings - 15 - 6

Friday, February 28th, 2020

These are the next 10 as ranked by myworld. Last week we ranked 30-16. Since there are more prospects to write about we limited this list to the next ten and will finish out the final five next week.

15. Arizona Diamondbacks (14.32)

This is a team filled with mid-level prospects. The cream could be Bahamian outfielder Kristian Robinson, who they signed for $2.5 million in 2017 and another outfielder, 2018 second round pick Alek Thomas, who in two years has a .312 minor league average. Their 2019 first round pick Corbin Carroll will fill out their future outfield. Catcher Daulton Varsho is about to make his presence known with a .301 average and 18 homeruns in AA last year. Geraldo Perdomo is a smooth fielding shortstop who carries very little power. Another Dominican shortstop, Liover Peguero, who was signed a year after Geraldo will have the better bat but not the better glove. Seth Beer was drafted in the first round by the Astros but traded to the Diamondbacks. He has a big time bat but his best position may be DH, a position that does not yet exist in the National League.

Blake Walston is a left handed pitcher to watch. He stands 6′5″, was drafted in the first round of the 2019 draft and lights the radar in the mid-90s. Two other players drafted in the first round of the 2019 draft are Brennan Malone and Drey Jameson, both righthanded pitchers. Brennan has the height (6′4″) and the fastball to achieve success while Drey stands just 6′0″ but has a swing and miss curveball. Pavin Smith is a first baseman/outfielder with a good hit tool that lacks elevation. Last year he slugged .466, which is a good sign.

14. Toronto Blue Jays (16.06)

The top prospect that lights up the radars in the triple digits is Nate Pearson, a first round pick in 2017. He could be in the Blue Jay rotation in 2020. Jordan Groshans was a 2018 first round pick who has a decent glove for short, but will probably need to move to third. The power bat is there for the corner spot. Don’t know how they will fit the name Simeon Woods Richardson on the back of his uniform but the 2018 second round pick has shown the ability to hit all four quadrants of the plate with a low 90s fastball with plus movement. Orelvis Martinez was signed out of the Dominican Republic for $3.51 million. He has impressive power but lacks the range to stick at short.

Others to watch are 2019 first round pick Alek Manoah, who in his debut struck out 14.3 hitters per nine innings with his mid-90s fastball.

13. St. Louis Cardinals

The Cardinals traded two pretty good outfielders to improve the opportunity of 2016 first round pick Dylan Carson making the roster out of spring training. He hit .361 with five homeruns in his 18 game debut at AAA last year. Those outfielders were traded to acquire the Rays 2018 first round pick Matthew Liberatore, a lefthander with a mid-90s fastball. Nolan Gorman, the 2018 first round pick is a power bat that plays third base.

Zack Thompson was the Cardinals first round pick in 2019. He is a lefty who now has the best curveball in the organization. Elehuris Montero had an off year last year. The Dominican third baseman doesn’t have the power of Gorman but he should hit 20 plus homeruns per year. Malcolm Nunez is another third baseman who came from Cuba in 2018. He showed massive power his first year, slugging .774 with 13 homeruns in 44 games in Rookie ball. That power disappeared last year when promoted to Low A.

12. San Francisco Giants (20.46)

The Giants are rebuilding and what better way to start than the replacement for Buster Posey. Joey Bart was the Giants first round pick in 2018, the second overall pick in the draft after Casey Mize. He will be a good hit and glove man behind the plate. Marco Luciano has some pretty impressive power with the tools to play shortstop. The Giants signed him for $2.6 million out of the Dominican Republic in 2018. He could be the next Wander Franco. Heliot Ramos, the Giants first round pick in 2017 out of Puerto Rico will end the Giants dearth of weak hitting outfielders. Hunter Bishop, a 2019 first round pick and Venezuelan Luis Matos, who was also signed in 2018, could join Ramos in the outfield. Seth Corry, a 2017 third round pick dominated last year at Low A (9-3, 1.76 ERA) with a low to mid 90s fastball. Mauricio Dubon became the first player born in Honduras to play in the major leagues. He was acquired from the Brewers and should win the second base job this year.

Alexander Canario showed some impressive power in rookie ball with 16 homeruns in 59 games. He could be ready for a break out season in 2020 if he can avoid the strikeouts. Will Wilson was a first round pick in 2019 and hopes to fill a middle position with the Giants. His lack of speed could prevent a permanent job at shortstop. Jaylin Davis may not be a prospect next year after slugging 35 homeruns last year. The Giants acquired him from the Twins last year, who acquired him in the 24th round of the 2015 draft.

11. Minnesota Twins (20.75)

Royce Lewis was the first player selected in the 2017 draft. Last year he struggled with the bat, failing to get it over .250 but he could become a power hitting shortstop, or move to third if Polanco stays at short. Alex Kirilloff was a first round pick in 2016, had Tommy John surgery then came back to hit .348 with 20 homeruns. Injuries again plagued the outfielder last year (wrist) which sapped the power from his bat. Trevor Larnach led Oregon State to the College World Series championship in 2018. His power bat will join Alex in the outfield after being drafted by the Twins in the first round in 2018. Jordan Balazovic is a burley Canadian pitcher who saw his fastball hit the mid to high 90s last year. Brent Rooker is a defensively challenged outfielder who may move to first base where his power bat will fit. He was a first round supplemental first round pick in 2017.

Misael Urbina is an outfielder from Venezuela who played last year in the Dominican Summer League. He is a good contact hitter with good speed to play centerfield. Keoni Cavaco was the Twins 2019 first round pick. He struggled in his first year, hitting just .172.

10. Baltimore Orioles (20.76)

Adley Rutschman was the first player selected in the 2019 draft who also played on the Oregon State College World Series champions in 2018. If he can survive injuries behind the plate he will be a special kind of catcher with a power bat and top rated defensive skills. Grayson Rodriguez throws from the right side while D.L. Hall throws from the left. Grayson is a big 6′5″ fireballer of a pitcher with a fastball in the mid-90s drafted in the first round in 2018. Hall was a first round pick in 2017, is not as tall (6′0″) but has excellent stuff, including a fastball that consistently hits the mid-90s. His curveball is a knee bender for hitters. Ryan Mountcastle is a hitter without a position to play. The 2015 first round pick was the MVP of the International League with his 25 homeruns. Austin Hays recovered from his poor, injury prone 2018 season and is expected to win the centerfield job in 2020.

Gunnar Henderson was drafted in the second round of the 2019 draft and signed him for $2.3 million. His tools may not fit at short but his power bat will look good at third. Adam Hall was also a second round pick (2017) but he is more a defensive shortstop with a questionable bat.

9. Oakland Athletics (21.22)

They have perhaps two of the best lefthanded pitchers in the minor leagues in Jesus Luzardo and A.J. Puk. Injuries prevented them from making the Athletics rotation last year, but if they stay injury free this year they will be in the starting rotation. Jesus was a third round pick of the Nationals in 2016, dropping in the draft after Tommy John surgery in his senior year in high school. Puk was the Athletics first round pick in 2016 and had Tommy John surgery in 2018. Sean Murphy a 2016 third round pick may be one of the best defensive catchers in the game who could provide a little pop with the bat. Robert Puason was signed out of the Dominican for $5.1 million in 2019. He appears to be a smooth fielding shortstop who will have a good bat.

Logan Davidson was the Athletics first round pick in 2019. The son of ex-major league Mark has the tools to stick at short but the power to move to third. Lazaro Armenteros was supposed to be a Cuban sensation when he signed for $3 million in 2016. The bat has not justified the hype to this point, but last year he did hit 17 homeruns, despite a poor .222 average to go with 227 whiffs in 126 games. If he can figure out how to hit a breaking ball he could justify his 2016 hype.

8. Miami Marlins (22.38)

Sixto Sanchez is a fireballing Dominican the Marlins acquired from the Phillies. He is slight of frame and has durability issues, but the fastball sizzles in triple digits. Jesus Sanchez is a five tool outfielder the Marlins acquired from the Rays. The Dominican could win the centerfield job in 2020 if Lewis Brinson continues to struggle. JJ Bleday is a slugging right fielder out of Vanderbilt the Marlins selected with their first pick in the 2019 draft. Jazz Chisholm was acquired from the Diamondbacks. The shortstop was signed out of the Bahamas in 2015 and slugged 21 homeruns last year. The tools are there for him to be a power hitting shortstop. Edward Cabrera is another pitcher that can hit the radar in triple digits, but at 6′4″ the Dominican has a towering plane. Monte Harrison is the last player in the Christian Yelich trade that has yet to reach the major leagues. He has good power and speed, but his swing and miss resulted in 215 whiffs in 2018. A wrist injury last year limited him to 58 games.

Lewin Diaz is a big power hitting first baseman the Marlins acquired from the Twins. Last year he slugged 27 homeruns. Jose Devers is the younger brother of Rafael, but is more a defensive stalwart at shortstop. He lacks the power of his brother. Jorge Guzman may be the hardest thrower in baseball but he has no command and lacks a third pitch. He is destined for the bullpen, perhaps in a closer role. Victor Victor Mesa and Victor Mesa Jr. are two brothers signed out of Cuba, whose dad was a star on the early Cuban teams. Victor Victor is said to have the better tools. Jerar Encarnacion hit two homeruns early in spring training, showing the power the outfielder possess.

7. Atlanta Braves

Lots of pitching on this team but outfielders Chistian Pache and Drew Waters could join Ronald Acuna in a couple years to form an impressive outfield. Both have burner speed to fit in center and good power to move to a corner. Ian Anderson, Kyle Wright and Bryse Wilson will all compete for the Braves starting rotation before the 2020 season ends. Bryse was a fourth round pick in 2018 while Anderson (2016) and Wright (2017) were first rounders. Shea Langliers was the Braves first round pick in the 2019 draft. The catcher may always get lost in the shadow of Rutschman but he is a superb defensive catcher with good hit tools.

Braden Shewmake was a first round supplemental pick in the 2019 draft and has already played in AA. He is a 6′4″ shortstop who could develop into a pretty impressive two way shortstop. Bryce Ball had to wait until the 24th round to hear his name called in the 2019 draft, but the first baseman hit .329 with 17 homeruns in his minor league debut.

6. Los Angeles Dodgers (27.14)

Not only is their major league team stacked, but their minor leagues is filled with prospects. Gavin Lux, the 2016 first round pick should win the second base job, but has the tools for short. He pulverized minor league pitcher for 26 homeruns in 113 games. Dustin May could fit in the Dodgers rotation this year. The 2016 third round pick has a red mane with a mid to high 90s fastball that makes it appear fire his coming out of his right hand. The Red Sox did not like Brusdar Graterol because he did not have the arm to start. The Dodgers will use his triple digit fastball out of the bullpen. Keibert Ruiz is blocked by Will Smith at the catcher position. A finger fracture ended his season early, but he can hit for average and has good defensive tools. Josiah Gray was acquired from the Reds in the Yasiel Puig/Matt Kemp deal and last year rose three levels to AA with good life on his low to mid 90s fastball. He could be the next rookie in the Dodger rotation for 2021. Tony Gonsolin had a big homerun bat in college but the Dodgers drafted him as a pitcher and in 2018 he was their pitcher of the year. He will be competing for a rotation spot in 2019. Kody Hoese was their first round pick in 2019. The third baseman slugged .779 in college and should carry that power to the major leagues. Diego Cartaya is a Venezuelan catcher the Dodgers signed for $2.5 million in 2018. He is an above average defensive catcher with a strong arm that has good hit tools.

Michael Busch was another first round 2019 pick who has a good bat, despite his .182 average last year. The Dodgers are trying him at second base but he has yet to establish himself at a defensive position. Outfielder Luis Rodriguez was signed out of Venezuela in 2019 for $2.6 million. He has all five tools to be a difference maker in centerfield. Andy Pages is an outfielder from Cuba who swatted 19 homeruns in 63 games in rookie ball.