Archive for the 'MLB' Category

Top Dominican Prospects in the National League

Tuesday, January 21st, 2020

The top two prospects from last year’s list, Fernando Tatis and Victor Robles made significant contributions to their major league teams. Another Padre Francisco Mejia, the fourth rated Dominican prospect lost his rookie status. Number nine prospect Sandy Alcantara started 32 games for the Marlins. That leaves four new spots with injuries knocking Alex Reyes off the list, though with all his time on the major league disabled list he may have lost his rookie status. Below are myworld’s top ten Dominican prospects in the National League.

1. Cristian Pache OF (Atl) - Last year he was the 7th rated Dominican prospect in the National League. What a difference a year of accomplishment can make. His defense is at the gold glove level and his bat has been showing some increasing pop the last two years. Pache did not hit any homeruns his first two years but nine in 2018 and 12 last year show the kind of pop that is there. He also peppered the gaps for a career high 36 doubles. He has the speed to steal bases, but after his 32 in 2017 he has failed to reach double digits his last two years. The arm is a rocket but with his defense there would be no need to move him away from centerfield. The batting average may hover around .250 but his defense should make him an asset to the Braves for a long time. That should start with the 2020 season.

2. O’Neil Cruz SS/OF (PGH) - Cruz was number 10 on this list last year. While he currently plays shortstop, myworld believes his 6′6″ height will eventually move him to the outfield. If he can stay at shortstop there would be no shortstop that could equal his power. A little too much swing and miss could limit his batting average and lesson his power numbers. A fractured foot last year also limited him to just 73 games. He was able to reach AA but hit only one homerun in over 120 at bats. The Pirates have always been patient with their prospects, trying to squeeze out every last year of prospect eligibility to their club. The injury and the Pirates conservative approach will keep Cruz in the minor leagues until 2021 at the earliest.

3. Ronny Mauricio SS (NYM) - Amed Rosario struggled on defense at shortstop last year for the Mets and Andres Gimenez is another defensive option. The most complete shortstop could be Mauricio. At 6′3″ he may eventually have to move to third if his body fills out. His lack of speed limits his range and if he continues to fill out that range could be further impacted. He has the hands and arm to play short. His bat is what gets the Mets excited. The bat should eventually hit for 20 plus homeruns, though he has yet to hit in double figures for power. He does show a lack of patience at the plate with a 4/1 strikeout to walk ratio, which could limit his average. Still a teenager Mauricio should be ready for High A in 2020 with a possible promotion to AA. Don’t expect him to see the Mets infield until 2021.

4. Brailyn Marquez LHP (CHC) - Lefthanders who can dial their fastball into the mid-90s are valuable commodities on any club. At 6′4″ Brailyn has the height to be a durable starting pitcher. Last year was his first year eclipsing 100 innings of work. A solid curveball and improving change give him three pitches to fit in the rotation. Last year the opposition hit him at .224, which is twenty points below his career minor league average. He also continued to strike out more than one batter per inning. One area he needs to work on is improving his control. Last year he walked about a hitter per two innings. The Cubs have not had a lot of success developing pitching. Next year he should see AA and if the Cubs can exercise patience he will not appear on the Cubs pitching rotation until 2021.

5. Sixto Sanchez RHP (Mia) - The Phillies signed Sixto in 2014, then traded him to the Marlins in 2019 for J.T. Realmuto. The fastball is explosive, cracking triple digits on the radar gun. His 6′0″ height makes his durability a question. He missed much of 2018 due to injury but averted the disabled list in 2019 to throw over 100 innings for the first time in his minor league career. He and Sandy Alcantara should make for an intimidating mound duo. Plus command of his fastball, curve and change trifecta should result in more swings and misses but he generally averages less than a whiff per inning. His 18 starts in AA should make him ready for the major league rotation some time in 2020.

6. Jesus Sanchez OF (Mia) - No relation to Sixto. Jesus got his start with Tampa Bay and then was traded to the Marlins a couple years ago for pitching help. Jesus has the potential to be a five tool player. His speed is not burner’s speed but it is enough to play centerfield. His arm is strong enough for right field, but with J.J. Bleday on the roster left field could be his eventual position. His bat lacks patience (39/100 walk to whiff ratio) which could limit his average to the .250s. His power is not massive but it should be enough to hit 20 plus homeruns. Despite his above average speed Jesus does not steal bases, failing to reach double digits in any of his minor league seasons. He should be in the Marlins roster sometime mid season of 2020.

7. Marco Luciano SS (SF) - Don’t know if the Giants can wait for Marco to be ready to replace the aging Brandon Crawford. They shelled out $2.6 million to sign him in 2018. Last year was his first season state side where he hit .322 in rookie ball. His 10 homeruns gave him a .616 slugging. That kind of power will not continue, but his bat is one of his strengths. The arm is there to stay at short but if his 6′2″ frame fills out too much he may have to move to third. Marco has the bat to make multiple All Star appearances. He will debut in the full season league in 2020 but is probably still three of four years from making the Giants. That will probably mean four years on this list.

8. Luis Garcia SS/2B (Was) - Not to be confused with the Luis Garcia on the Phillies. Teams have inquired about Luis, but despite their playoff run the Nationals kept Garcia off the market. With Anthony Rendon gone and temporary veteran replacements to cover second and third, Garcia’s time to wear a Nationals uniform should be soon. He lacks the power to play third and he will not usurp Turner from short. So second base could be his ultimate position. His minor league numbers have not been impressive (.257 average and .617 OPS) until you realize he is only a 19 year old trying to solve AA pitching. His speed is not great so if Luis hopes to make an impact his bat has to be in the neighborhood of .300 with double digit homerun power less than 20. National fans should see his major league debut in 2020.

9. Edward Cabrera RHP (Mia) - Make that a threesome. With Alcantara, Sixto and Cabrera in the rotation the Marlins should be scary. Cabrera is another arm that can hit triple digits, but for the most part will sit in the mid-90s. If he can refine his change to make it a more swing and miss offering he will fit in the rotation. If not he could be the Marlins closer. Last year he limited the opposition to a .190 average and struck out more than a hitter an inning. His eight starts in AA make debuting in the Marlins rotation in 2020 a slight possibility. Because 100 innings pitched in 2018 has been his maximum innings level, the Marlins need to leave him in the minor leagues to control his innings.

10. Geraldo Perdomo SS (Ari) - The Diamondbacks only paid $70,000 for him back in 2016. Advance three years and Geraldo has turned himself into a top level prospect. His tools should be sufficient to stay at shortstop, but as with any 6′3″ Dominican this could change as he fills out. The bat makes good contact with more walks than whiffs last year (70/67). There is not a lot of power in his bat so if he can keep his average in the .300 neighborhood he could become a useful starter. His lack of speed does not project for high stolen base totals. Last year he got 26 games in High A so he is at least a couple years away from the Diamondbacks.

Significant Major League Roster Rule Changes

Thursday, January 16th, 2020

The major leagues have established some significant rule changes that will have an impact on how teams build their rosters for the 2020 season. Below is a list of the rule changes.

1) Teams can expand their roster to 26 players, 27 when playing a double header.

2) Of those roster players only 13 can be pitchers. To be identified as a pitcher a player must have pitched in at least 20 innings in a major league game during the 2018 and 2019 seasons. Myworld is not aware of a restriction on the number of position players a team can have on their major league roster, but to be designated as a position player he must have played in at least 20 games and accumulated at least three plate appearances in each of those games. This seems to eliminate games in which a player had less than three plate appearances, which means you cannot assume that because a player has appeared in 20 games and has 60 plate appearances he qualifies as a position player.

3) A position player cannot appear in a game to pitch until after the ninth inning or if a team is ahead or behind by more than six runs.

4) Pitchers must face at least three batters or finish an inning when they make an appearance on the mound. An exception would be made for a pitcher that suffered an injury prior to him facing three hitters. This appears to eliminate the lefthanded pitching specialist strategy.

5) When September rolls around you can only have a maximum of 28 players on the roster. This eliminates the September callup rule, but teams can still massage this restriction by using their full 40 man roster in September, just like they do in the regular season. They will have to find players who have options available and rotate players up and down in September, knowing that if a player is optioned down they cannot be called up for ten days unless for injury. Just like the regular season there could be a number of players designated for assignment as teams try to manage their rosters.

6) The amount of time players must spend on the disabled list has been raised from 10 to 15 days.

Top Prospects from the Dominican Republic in the American League

Tuesday, January 14th, 2020

This is the first of our top prospect lists from each country or continent. The Dominican Republic has the most prospects in baseball so it is pretty easy creating a top ten list, so we break it off into the American League and National League. Other countries or continents require a deep dive into the minor leagues just to find players. Some countries may have less than ten players and if they are not included in a continent rating they will probably not be mentioned.

There were two successes among the Dominicans from last years list in the American League. The top prospect Vladimir Guerrero did not make the big splash as many expected, but he still earned the starting third base job for the Blue Jays. He had a decent year but may have been upstaged by rookie teammate Bo Bichette. Eloy Jimenez, the fourth rated prospect hit 31 homeruns and made an impact for the White Sox. One player who made the American League list (Jesus Sanchez) was traded to the National League. Wander Javier, Albert Abreu and Seuly Matias did not perform to expectations and were surpassed by newer prospects.

1. Wander Franco SS (Tampa Bay) - Like Guerrero on the list last year, Wander appears on many publications as the top prospect in baseball. Others who have appeared on the list include players like Jurickson Profar, Yoan Moncada and Bryan Harper. Franco plays a solid shortstop and can hit for average (.327) and power (.487). Even if he fills out and loses the range to play short his bat will play at third base. He has yet to play AA so the Rays have another year to decide what to do with him. They still have a couple cheap years of Willy Adames as their current shortstop, but once he reaches the age of arbitration they may look to trade him to make room for the cheaper and more productive Franco. Franco has hit over .300 at every level he has played and is expected to make his debut with the Rays sometime in 2021, depending on how Adames is taking to the shortstop position.

2. Julio Rodriguez OF (Seattle) - Last year Rodriguez was rated eighth. That was based on his 59 game debut in the Rookie League in 2018 where he hit .315 with a .526 slugging. The Mariners had forked over $1.75 million to sign him. He only elevated his stock after his 2019 season when he hit .326 with a .540 slugging, reaching High A as a 19 year old. His lack of speed will limit him to a corner, but he has the arm to play right. He could become the Mariners version of Juan Soto. If he takes the same path as Soto he will reach the Mariners next season, but expect him more in 2021.

3. Jasson Dominguez OF (New York) - Jasson is a mystery since he did not play last year. The Yankees signed him for $5.1 million. At 16 he still has a ways to go to reach Yankee Stadium. In the States he would still be eligible to play for the Junior Varsity baseball team in high school. Jasson carries all five tools, with the speed to play center and the power to bat in the middle of the order. If he should fill out the arm is strong enough for right field. Yankee fans will have to wait until 2023 before they will see him in the major leagues, but he could rise quickly.

4. Vidal Brujan 2B (Tampa Bay) - Vidal is more a speed guy. In the last two years he has stolen over 100 bases. Coming into the 2019 season he carried a .300 career average, but last year he hit .277. There is not a lot of power in his bat and it would be better if he could fit at short. With Adames and Franco playing there and a fairly average arm his best fit may be second base. Franco would bat in the middle of the lineup while Brujan would bat leadoff. Since he played 55 games in AA he could be ready to make his Rays debut sometime late in the 2020 season.

5. Noelvi Marti SS (Seattle) - Marte has not yet played state side. The Mariners signed him in 2018 for $1.55 million. Last year he played in the Dominican Summer League and hit .309 with 9 homeruns and a .511 slugging percentage. He also has the speed to steal bases, pilfering 17 last year. His arm is strong enough to fit at short but a lot will depend on how is body fills out. The power is there where a move to third would fit. Noelvi is still probably four to five years away from playing in the major leagues, so Mariners brass will have plenty of time to evaluate him to determine his ultimate position.

6. Deivi Garcia RHP (New York) - One Yankee pitcher dropped from the list (Albert Abreu) and two rise from the lower levels of the minor leagues to replace him. Garcia has a lights out arm that can throw a fastball in the mid-90s. He also has the finesse to buckle knees with his curve ball. What he lacks is the height (5′9″) that many like to see in a righthander. Last year he rose three levels, finishing with six starts in AAA while striking out 165 hitters in just 111 innings and limiting the opposition to a .231 average. He was hit a little harder in AAA (.262) and that could be a problem as he reaches the major leagues. If the Yankees have the need for bullpen or starting pitching help in 2020 expect Garcia to be one of the first pitchers to be considered for a promotion.

7. Luis Gil RHP (New York) - His 6′3″ height is more what scouts look for in a starting pitcher. Gil was not signed by the Yankees but acquired from the Twins in 2018 for Jake Cave. The Twins only paid $90,000 to sign him. Since signing in 2014 Gil had yet to pitch in the full season leagues, missing all of the 2016 season after shoulder surgery. Last year he jumped to the Florida State League, dominating at the Low A level (2.39 ERA with 112 whiffs in 83 innings). His fastball can hit triple digits, but it sits in the mid-90s range. Throwing strikes can be a bit of an issue for Gil. He also needs to find a third pitch to stay in the rotation. Luis will start the season in the Florida State League and if he does well he could see the Yankee bullpen in 2022.

8. Leody Taveras OF (Texas) - He is a stellar defensive player who is normally one of the youngest players at the level he has played. If he can carry a decent bat he could win gold gloves in centerfield. He came into the 2019 season with a .253 minor league career average but last year broke out to hit .279 average, good enough to get a promotion to AA. Last year he also elevated his stolen base game, stealing a career high 32 bases. There will not be a lot of power in the bat so he will need to rely on his glove and legs to win a major league job. If that happens he should see the Rangers as a September callup in 2020.

9. Jorge Mateo SS/OF (Oakland) - Myworld cannot give up on his potential. He shows some sneaky power, good enough to hit 19 homeruns last year and his legs can cover a lot of ground if the Athletics decide to move him to centerfield. He no longer appears to be the 50 stolen base threat he was early in his career, but he can still get over 20. Last year he was one homerun shy of being 20/20. Making contact can still be a challenge and a 29/145 walk to whiff ratio may lead to a number of extended slumps. The Yankees made him part of the Sonny Gray trade in 2017. Next year he could make the Athletics as a utility player, fitting in centerfield and the middle infield positions. The recent acquisition of Tony Kemp seems to have hurt his cause in the short run, but he has too many tools not to be given the opportunity.

10. Jose Soriano RHP (Los Angeles) - He only signed for $70,000 in 2016, at 18 fairly old for a Dominican. He sprouted to 6′3″ and last year sprayed his fastball to the plate into the high 90s, a significant increase from last year. He got more swings and misses, finishing with more than a strikeout per inning for the first time in his career. In Low A he limited the opposition to a .197 average. The big area of concern is his inability to find the strike zone. He normally goes above 4.5 walks per nine innings. Until he finds more consistency finding the strike zone his major league debut could be delayed, but expect it to happen sometime in 2021.

NL East Lower Draft Pick Success

Tuesday, January 7th, 2020

Myworld takes a look at the NL East to see how they have done selecting with the 25th round pick or later. This is our last division to look at. As usual, we start with 1998 when drafts were established at 50 picks, further reduced to 40 a few years later. Also, we did not include any player signed in the 25th round or later who did not sign but made the major leagues after a later draft. Myworld did not look at draft years 2015 or later since any late round picks making the major league roster in four years or less would be slim to none.

Atlanta Braves

Tim Spooneybarger OF (1998/29th round) - 2-3, 3.24 in 88 games of relief
Brad Voyles RHP (1998/45th round) - 0-4, 6.45 in 40 games, three of them starts
John Foster LHP (1999/25th round) - 7-2, 4.90 in 90 games of relief
Johnny Venters LHP (2003/30th round) - 20-13, 2.71 in 292 games, with one start
Ryne Harper RHP (2011/37th round) - 4-2, 3.81 in 61 games of relief

Nick Green 2B (1998/32nd round) - .236, 17, 103 in 417 games
Adam LaRoche 1B (2000/29th round) - .260, 255, 882 in 1605 games
Tyler Flowers 1B (2005/33rd round) - .238, 85, 296 in 780 games

Miami Marlins

Kevin Olsen RHP (1998/26th round) - 0-5, 5.12 in 28 games, ten starts
Tim Wood RHP (2002/44th round) - 1-4, 4.50 in 57 games of relief
Alex Sanabia RHP (2006/32nd round) - 8-10, 4.15 in 28 games, 24 starts
Brandon Cunniff RHP (2010/27th round) - 4-2, 4.50 in 54 games of relief

Jim Aducci OF (2003/42nd round) - .232, 5, 39 in 151 games

New York Mets

Josh Stinson RHP (2006/37th round) - 0-2, 4.47 in 39 games, two of them starts
Josh Edgin LHP (2010/30th round) - 4-4, 3.49 in 177 games of relief
Seth Lugo RHP (2011/34th round) - 22-15, 3.27 in 151 games, 31 of them starts
Chasen Bradford RHP (2011/35th round) - 7-0, 3.89, 86 games of relief

Earl Snyder 1B (1998/30th round) - .203, 1, 4 in 18 games
Mike Jacobs C (1999/38th round) - .253, 100, 312 in 569 games
Juan Centeno C (2007/32nd round) - .223, 6, 37 in 118 games

Philadelphia Phillies

Jacob Diekman LHP (2007/30th round) - 15-22, 3.90 in 441 games of relief
Jarred Cosart RHP (2008/38th round) - 16-23, 3.98 in 74 games, 72 starts

Brock Stassi OF (2011/33rd round) - .167, 2, 7 in 51 games

Washington Nationals

Jim Henderson RHP (2003/26th round) - 10-11, 3.61 in 155 games of relief
Brad Peacock RHP (2006/41st round) - 34-30, 3.99 in 178 games, 83 starts

Billy Burns OF (2011/32nd round) - .270, 5, 55, 46 stolen bases in 242 games

NL Central Lower Draft Pick Success

Sunday, January 5th, 2020

Myworld takes a look at the NL Central to see how they have done selecting with the 25th round pick or later. We start with 1998 when drafts were established at 50 picks, further reduced to 40 a few years later. Also, we did not include any player signed in the 25th round or later who did not sign but made the major leagues after a later draft. Myworld did not look at draft years 2015 or later since any late round picks making the major league roster in four years or less would be slim to none.

Chicago Cubs

Randy Wells C (2002/38th round) - 28-32, 4.08 in 98 games, 86 starts
Dallas Beeler RHP (2010/41st round) - 0-3, 6.05 in five games, all of them starts

Russ Canzler 3B (2004/30th round) - .269, 3, 11 in 26 games
Justin Bour 1B (2009/25th round) - .253, 92, 303 in 559 games

Cincinnati Reds

Todd Coffey RHP (1998/41st round) - 25-18, 4.10 in 46 games of relief - more than a cup of coffee
Mike Neu RHP (1998/29th round) - 0-0, 3.72 in 33 games of relief
Curtis Patch RHP (2007/26th round) - 1-1, 5.52 in 22 games of relief

Milwaukee Brewers

Manny Parra LHP (2001/26th round) - 29-41, 4.90 in 322 games, 74 starts
Craig Breslow LHP (2002/26th round) - 23-30, 3.45 in 516 games, two starts
Tim Dillard C (2002/34th round) - 1-4, 4.70 in 73 games of relief
Brent Sutter LHP (2012/31st round) - 65 games, 34 of them starts
Tyler Alexander LHP (2013/27th round) - 1-4, 4.86 in 13 games, 8 starts

Taylor Green 2B (2005/25th round) - .207, 3, 15 in 78 games of relief
Jason Rogers 1B (2010/32nd round) - .258, 4, 18 in 117 games

Pittsburgh Pirates

Ian Snell RHP (2000/26th round) - 152 games, 136 starts
Shane Youman LHP (2001/43rd round) - 3-7, 5.13, 21 games, 11 starts
Todd Redmond C (2004/39th round) - 5-8, 4.25 in 67 games, 16 starts
Casey Sadler RHP (2010/25th round) - 5-1, 3.55 in 42 games, two of them starts

Nate McLouth 2B (2000/25th round) - .247, 101, 333 in 1,045 games
Chris Shelton C (2001/33rd round) - .273, 37, 124 in 299 games
Rajai Davis 2B (2001/38th round) - .262, 62, 387, 415 stolen bases in 1,448 games
Nyjer Morgan OF (2002/33rd round) - .282, 12, 136, 120 stolen bases in 598 games

St. Louis Cardinals

Tyler Johnson 1B (2000/34th round) - 3-5, 4.32 in 116 games of relief
Blake Hawksworth RHP (2001/26th round) - 10-13, 4.07 in 124 games, 8 starts
Kyler McClellan RHP (2002/25th round) - 19-24, 3.79 in 268 games, 17 starts
Luke Gregerson RHP (2006/28th round) - 35-36, 3.15 in 646 games of relief
Michael Blazek RHP (2007/35th round) - 8-6, 4.50 in 113 games, only one start
Sam Freeman LHP (2008/32nd round) - 8-7, 3.62 in 264 games of relief
Kevin Siegrist LHP (2008/41st round) - 18-10, 3.04 in 276 games of relief

Bo Hart ss/2B (1999/33rd round) - .272, 4, 30 in 88 games
Mike McCoy 2B (2002/34th round) - .190, 3, 20 in 170 games
Tony Cruz 3B (2007/26th round) - .216, 6, 61 in 272 games
Adron Chambers OF (2007/38th round) - .216, 0, 9 in 84 games

Myworld 2019 Predictions

Sunday, January 5th, 2020

Myworld is in the process of putting out our 2020 predictions. Not that it really means anything. But just for fun we took a look at our 2019 predictions.

We had the most success in predicting the first and the last place teams, having a success rate of 67 percent. Our worst area was predicting the third place team (17 percent success rate). The most accurate predictions were in the AL Central and the AL East where we would have been perfect if not for the placement of two teams switching one position. Our worst division was the NL West where we got the Dodgers right in winning the division but no other team finished within two spots of where we predicted them.

Below are the 2019 predictions with their actual finish in parenthesis.

AL West

1. Houston (1), 2. L.A. Angels (4), 3. Oakland (2), 4. Texas (3), 5. Seattle (5)

AL Central

1. Minnesota (1), 2. Cleveland (2), 3. Chicago (3), 4. Detroit (5), 5. Kansas City (4)

AL East

1. New York (1), 2. Boston (3), 3. Tampa Bay (2), 4. Toronto (4), 5. Baltimore (5)

NL West

1. Los Angeles (1), 2. Colorado (4), 3. San Diego (5), 4. Arizona (2), 5. San Francisco (3)

NL Central

1. Chicago (3), 2. Milwaukee (2), 3. St. Louis (1), 4. Cincinnati (4), 5. Pittsburgh (5)

NL East

1. Philadelphia (4), 2. Washington (2), 3. Atlanta (1), 4. New York (3), 5. Miami (5)

NL West Lower Draft Pick Success

Tuesday, December 31st, 2019

Myworld takes a look at the NL West to see how they have done selecting with the 25th round pick or later. This division seems to have pretty good success with late round picks, especially the Giants and Padres. We start with 1998 when drafts were established at 50 picks, further reduced to 40 a few years later. Also, we did not include any player signed in the 25th round or later who did not sign but made the major leagues after a later draft. Myworld did not look at draft years 2015 or later since any late round picks making the major league roster in four years or less would be slim to none.

Arizona Diamondbacks

Mike Koplove RHP (1998/29th round) - 15-7, 3.82 in 222 games of relief
Tommy Layne LHP (2007/26th round) - 8-5, 3.61 in 216 games of relief
Evan Scribner RHP (2007/28th round) - 5-4, 4.15 in 145 games of relief
Ryan Cook RHP (2008/27th round) - 15-13, 3.58 in 236 games of relief

Jake Elmore 2B (2008/34th round) - .215, 4, 37 in 217 games

Colorado Rockies

Justin Hampson LHP (1999/28th round) - 5-4, 3.23 in 92 games, one of them a start.
Xavier Cedeno LHP (2004/31st round) - 10-7, 3.65 in 254 games of relief
Bruce Billings RHP (2007/30th round) - 0-0, 9.82 in five games of relief
Kenny Roberts LHP (2010/25th round) - 1-1, 7.24 in 15 games of relief

Eric Young Jr 2B (2003/30th round) - .245, 13, 112 and 162 stolen bases in 651 games

Los Angeles Dodgers

Matt Magill RHP (2008/31st round) - 8-7, 4.52 in 31 games
Shawn Tolleson RHP (2010/30th round) - 14-8, 3.92 in 215 games of relief
Danny Coulombe LHP (2012/25th round) - 6-4, 4.27 in 153 games of relief

Victor Diaz 2B (2000/37th round) - .256, 24, 73 in 147 games
Andy LaRoche SS (2003/39th round) - .226, 22, 113 in 404 games
Justin Ruggiano OF (2004/25th round) - .256, 53, 163 in 483 games
Jerry Sands OF (2008/25th round) - .238, 10, 57 in 156 games, currently playing in Korea
Scott Schebler OF (2010/26th round) - .240, 61, 167 in 379 games

San Diego Padres

Cliff Bartosh LHP (1998/29th round) - 1-2, 5.08 in 53 games of relief
Jack Cassel RHP (2000/25th round) - 2-2. 4.92 in 15 games, seven of them starts
Steve Delabar RHP (2003/29th round) - 15-9, 4.07 in 190 games of relief
Branden Kintzler RHP (2004/40th round) - 20-20, 3.37 in 430 games of relief
Dylan Axelrod RHP (2007/30th round) - 9-15, 5.27 in 59 games, 34 starts
Colt Hynes LHP (2007/31st round) - 0-0, 8.55 in 27 games of relief
Brad Brach RHP (2008/42nd round) - 36-27, 3.33 in 482 games of relief

Kevin Reese OF (2000/27th round) - .385, 0, 1 in 12 games
Drew Macias OF (2002/35th round) - .198, 3, 12 in 69 games
Kyle Blanks 1B (2004/42nd round) - .241, 33, 111 in 278 games
Andy Parrino 2B (2007/26th round) - .175, 2, 14 in 131 games
Dean Anna SS (2008/26th round) - .130, 1, 3 in 13 games
Dan Robertson OF (2008/33rd round) - .262, 1, 36 in 148 games

San Francisco Giants

Brian Burres LHP (2000/31st round) - 18-25, 5.75 in 106 games, 56 starts
Scott Munter RHP (2001/47th round) - 3-2, 4.75 in 84 games of relief
Matt Palmer RHP (2002/31st round) - 13-7, 4.56 in 63 games, 20 starts
Jonathan Sanchez LHP (2004/27th round) - 39-58, 4.70 in 194 games, 137 starts
Sergio Romo RHP (2005/28th round) - 40-32, 2.92, 129 saves in 708 games, two starts
Jake Dunning SS (2009/33rd round) - 0-2, 2.77 in 30 games of relief
Joe Biagini RHP (2011/26th round) - 14-25, 4.86 in 217 games, 22 starts

Antoan Richardson OF (2005/35th round) - .350, 0, 1 in 22 games
Thomas Neal OF (2005/36th round) - .184, 0, 2 in 15 games
Matt Downs 3B (2006/36th round) - .230, 20, 66 in 254 games
Johnny Monell C (2007/30th round) - .161, 0, 5 in 35 games

AL West Lower Draft Round Success

Sunday, December 29th, 2019

Now we look at the AL West to see how they have done selecting with the 25th round pick or later. The Rangers could almost create a starting rotation. We start with 1998 when drafts were established at 50 picks, further reduced to 40 a few years later. Also, if any player signed in the 25th round or later did not sign they were not included in this list. Myworld did not look at draft years 2015 or later since any late round picks making the major league roster in four years or less would be slim to none.

Houston Astros

Mike Burns RHP (2000/30th round) - 3-5, 5.75, 15 games, 8 starts

Tyler White 3B (2013/33rd round) - .236, 26, 103 in 256 games

Los Angeles Angels

Bobby Wilson C (2002/48th round) - .203, 18, 102 in 386 games
Efren Navarro 1B (2007/50th round) - .241, 3, 22 in 157 games
Jett Bandy C (2011/31st round) - .218, 16, 45 in 156 games
Michael Hermosillo OF (2013/28th round) - .183, 1, 4 in 49 games

Oakland Athletics

Ron Flores LHP (2000/20th round) - 1-4, 3.05, in 53 games in relief
Connor Robertson RHP (2004/31st round) - 0-1, 8.00 in 9 games of relief
Jeff Gray RHP (2004/32nd round) - 9-3, 4.99 in 115 games of relief
Brad Kilby LHP (2005/29th round) - 1-0, 1.07 in 16 games, one start
Mickey Storey RHP (2008/31st round) - 0-1, 4.19 in 29 games of relief
Ryan Dull RHP (2012/32nd round) - 8-9, 4.31 in 171 games of relief

Seattle Mariners

Scott Atchison RHP (1998/49th round) - 17-11, 3.63 in 298 games with just one start

T.J. Bohn OF (2002/30th round) - .211, 1, 5 in 32 games

Texas Rangers

Jason Botts 1B (1999/46th round) - .230, 5, 28 in 93 games

Jesse Chavez RHP (2002/42nd round) - 41-58, 4.48 in 463 games, 79 starts
Scott Feldman RHP (2003/30th round) - 78-84, 4.43 in 342 games, 204 starts
Derek Holland LHP (2006/25th round) - 78-78, 4.54 in 295 games, 222 starts
Danny Herrera LHP (2006/45th round) - 5-8, 3.72 in 131 games of relief
Tanner Roark RHP (2008/25th round) - 74-64, 3.71 in 213 games, 172 starts
Cody Eppley RHP (2008/43rd round) - 2-3, 4.61 in 71 games of relief
Alex Claudio LHP (2010/27th round) - 15-8, 3.38 in 291 game, with two starts
Phil Klein RHP (2011/30th round) - 2-3, 5.50 in 40 games, with four starts
C.J. (Carl) Edwards (2011/48th round) - 9-8, 3.58 in 194 games of relief
Joe Palumbo LHP (2013/30th round) - 0-3, 9.18, seven games with four starts

Major League Pitcher Trivia

Friday, December 27th, 2019

The average fastball for a major league pitcher in 2019 reached 93.1 miles per hour. This is the greatest speed since velocity has been measured. There were 149 pitchers who threw an average fastball 95 or harder.

There were only two pitchers in 2019 who averaged over 100 miles per hour, Jordan Hicks at 101.1 and Aroldis Chapman at 100.1. Following him were Andres Munoz (99.9), Emmanuel Chase (99.3), Brusdar Graterol (99.1) and Tayron Guerrero (99).

Gerritt Cole and Justin Verlander were the first two teammates to strikeout more than 300 hitters per season since Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling did it in 2002.

With major league rosters expanding to 26 with a maximum of 13 pitchers, it might be wise for teams to develop more two way players if they prefer to whittle their roster to 12 position players. The hitter with the greatest average exit velocity in major league baseball according to statcast was pitcher/outfielder Michael Lorenzon who averaged 97 miles per hour off the bat. His launch angel was disappointing Second was Aaron Judge who was measured at 96.7 miles per hour.

Shohei Ohtani was in the top 20 at 17th with a 93.4 exit velocity. He had a much better launch angle to his hits than Lorenzon.

AL Central Lower Round Draft Pick Success

Friday, December 27th, 2019

A couple days ago we did the AL East teams and the players drafted 25th or lower who achieved major league success for more than a year, with some exceptions. Myworld started the review for drafts in 1998 when they limited the picks to 50 players and went to 2015 when we felt most players from that draft and later would still be in the minor leagues. Below is the AL Central major league success rate.

Chicago White Sox

Mark Buehrle LHP (1998/38th round) - 214-160, 3.81 in 518 games, 493 of them starts.
Joe Valentine RHP (1999/26th round) - 2-4, 6.70 in 42 games of relief except for one start
Jeff Bajenaru RHP (1999/36th round) - 0-2, 11.20 in 14 games of relief
Charlie Haeger RHP (2001/25th round) - 2-7, 6.40 in 34 games, 10 of them starts
Jay Marshall LHP (2002/25th round) - 1-4, 7.66 in 61 games of relief
Hector Santiago LHP (2006/30th round) - 47-50, 4.14 in 257 games, 139 of them starts
Chris Devenski RHP (2011/25th round) - 16-15, 3.21 in 221 games, 7 of them starts

Cleveland Indians

Tony Sipp LHP (2004, 45th round) - 26-22, 3.72 in 616 games of relief
Vidal Nuno LHP (2009/48th round) - 8-23, 4.06 in 155 games, 42 of them starts

Jon Van Every OF (2000/29th round) - .255, 2, 9 in 39 games
Roberto Perez C (2008/33rd round) - .216, 45, 162 in 414 games

Detroit Tigers

Eric Eckenstahler LHP (1999/32nd round) - 1-0, 3.80 in 27 games of relief
Jason Frasor RHP (1999/33rd round) - 35-35, 3.49 in 679 games of relief
Joe Mantiply LHP (2013/27th round) - 1-0, 12.71 in 6 games of relief

Dusty Ryan C (2003/48th round) - .257, 2, 11 in 27 games
Will Rhymes 2B (2005/27th round) - .266, 2, 29 in 130 games

Kansas City Royals

Ruben Gotay 2B/SS (2000/31st round) - .255, 12, 77 RBIs in 316 games
Jarrod Dyson OF (2006/50th round) - .247, 21, 170 with 250 stolen bases in 858 games
Clint Robinson 1B (2007/25th round) - .257, 15, 62 in 243 games

Minnesota Twins

Kevin Frederick RHP (1998/29th round) - 0-2, 7.59 in 30 games of relief
Nick Blackburn RHP (2001/29th round) - 43-55, 4.85 in 145 games, 137 of them starts
Michael Tonkin RHP (2008/30th round) - 3-3, 4.43 in 141 games of relief
A.J. Achter RHP (2010/46th round) - 2-1, 3.92 in 45 games of relief

Terry Tiffee 1B (1999/26th round) - .226, 5, 29 in 97 games
Rene Tosoni OF (2005/36th round) - .203, 5, 22 in 60 games