Archive for the 'Yankees' Category

Top Prospects from the Dominican Republic in the American League

Tuesday, January 14th, 2020

This is the first of our top prospect lists from each country or continent. The Dominican Republic has the most prospects in baseball so it is pretty easy creating a top ten list, so we break it off into the American League and National League. Other countries or continents require a deep dive into the minor leagues just to find players. Some countries may have less than ten players and if they are not included in a continent rating they will probably not be mentioned.

There were two successes among the Dominicans from last years list in the American League. The top prospect Vladimir Guerrero did not make the big splash as many expected, but he still earned the starting third base job for the Blue Jays. He had a decent year but may have been upstaged by rookie teammate Bo Bichette. Eloy Jimenez, the fourth rated prospect hit 31 homeruns and made an impact for the White Sox. One player who made the American League list (Jesus Sanchez) was traded to the National League. Wander Javier, Albert Abreu and Seuly Matias did not perform to expectations and were surpassed by newer prospects.

1. Wander Franco SS (Tampa Bay) - Like Guerrero on the list last year, Wander appears on many publications as the top prospect in baseball. Others who have appeared on the list include players like Jurickson Profar, Yoan Moncada and Bryan Harper. Franco plays a solid shortstop and can hit for average (.327) and power (.487). Even if he fills out and loses the range to play short his bat will play at third base. He has yet to play AA so the Rays have another year to decide what to do with him. They still have a couple cheap years of Willy Adames as their current shortstop, but once he reaches the age of arbitration they may look to trade him to make room for the cheaper and more productive Franco. Franco has hit over .300 at every level he has played and is expected to make his debut with the Rays sometime in 2021, depending on how Adames is taking to the shortstop position.

2. Julio Rodriguez OF (Seattle) - Last year Rodriguez was rated eighth. That was based on his 59 game debut in the Rookie League in 2018 where he hit .315 with a .526 slugging. The Mariners had forked over $1.75 million to sign him. He only elevated his stock after his 2019 season when he hit .326 with a .540 slugging, reaching High A as a 19 year old. His lack of speed will limit him to a corner, but he has the arm to play right. He could become the Mariners version of Juan Soto. If he takes the same path as Soto he will reach the Mariners next season, but expect him more in 2021.

3. Jasson Dominguez OF (New York) - Jasson is a mystery since he did not play last year. The Yankees signed him for $5.1 million. At 16 he still has a ways to go to reach Yankee Stadium. In the States he would still be eligible to play for the Junior Varsity baseball team in high school. Jasson carries all five tools, with the speed to play center and the power to bat in the middle of the order. If he should fill out the arm is strong enough for right field. Yankee fans will have to wait until 2023 before they will see him in the major leagues, but he could rise quickly.

4. Vidal Brujan 2B (Tampa Bay) - Vidal is more a speed guy. In the last two years he has stolen over 100 bases. Coming into the 2019 season he carried a .300 career average, but last year he hit .277. There is not a lot of power in his bat and it would be better if he could fit at short. With Adames and Franco playing there and a fairly average arm his best fit may be second base. Franco would bat in the middle of the lineup while Brujan would bat leadoff. Since he played 55 games in AA he could be ready to make his Rays debut sometime late in the 2020 season.

5. Noelvi Marti SS (Seattle) - Marte has not yet played state side. The Mariners signed him in 2018 for $1.55 million. Last year he played in the Dominican Summer League and hit .309 with 9 homeruns and a .511 slugging percentage. He also has the speed to steal bases, pilfering 17 last year. His arm is strong enough to fit at short but a lot will depend on how is body fills out. The power is there where a move to third would fit. Noelvi is still probably four to five years away from playing in the major leagues, so Mariners brass will have plenty of time to evaluate him to determine his ultimate position.

6. Deivi Garcia RHP (New York) - One Yankee pitcher dropped from the list (Albert Abreu) and two rise from the lower levels of the minor leagues to replace him. Garcia has a lights out arm that can throw a fastball in the mid-90s. He also has the finesse to buckle knees with his curve ball. What he lacks is the height (5′9″) that many like to see in a righthander. Last year he rose three levels, finishing with six starts in AAA while striking out 165 hitters in just 111 innings and limiting the opposition to a .231 average. He was hit a little harder in AAA (.262) and that could be a problem as he reaches the major leagues. If the Yankees have the need for bullpen or starting pitching help in 2020 expect Garcia to be one of the first pitchers to be considered for a promotion.

7. Luis Gil RHP (New York) - His 6′3″ height is more what scouts look for in a starting pitcher. Gil was not signed by the Yankees but acquired from the Twins in 2018 for Jake Cave. The Twins only paid $90,000 to sign him. Since signing in 2014 Gil had yet to pitch in the full season leagues, missing all of the 2016 season after shoulder surgery. Last year he jumped to the Florida State League, dominating at the Low A level (2.39 ERA with 112 whiffs in 83 innings). His fastball can hit triple digits, but it sits in the mid-90s range. Throwing strikes can be a bit of an issue for Gil. He also needs to find a third pitch to stay in the rotation. Luis will start the season in the Florida State League and if he does well he could see the Yankee bullpen in 2022.

8. Leody Taveras OF (Texas) - He is a stellar defensive player who is normally one of the youngest players at the level he has played. If he can carry a decent bat he could win gold gloves in centerfield. He came into the 2019 season with a .253 minor league career average but last year broke out to hit .279 average, good enough to get a promotion to AA. Last year he also elevated his stolen base game, stealing a career high 32 bases. There will not be a lot of power in the bat so he will need to rely on his glove and legs to win a major league job. If that happens he should see the Rangers as a September callup in 2020.

9. Jorge Mateo SS/OF (Oakland) - Myworld cannot give up on his potential. He shows some sneaky power, good enough to hit 19 homeruns last year and his legs can cover a lot of ground if the Athletics decide to move him to centerfield. He no longer appears to be the 50 stolen base threat he was early in his career, but he can still get over 20. Last year he was one homerun shy of being 20/20. Making contact can still be a challenge and a 29/145 walk to whiff ratio may lead to a number of extended slumps. The Yankees made him part of the Sonny Gray trade in 2017. Next year he could make the Athletics as a utility player, fitting in centerfield and the middle infield positions. The recent acquisition of Tony Kemp seems to have hurt his cause in the short run, but he has too many tools not to be given the opportunity.

10. Jose Soriano RHP (Los Angeles) - He only signed for $70,000 in 2016, at 18 fairly old for a Dominican. He sprouted to 6′3″ and last year sprayed his fastball to the plate into the high 90s, a significant increase from last year. He got more swings and misses, finishing with more than a strikeout per inning for the first time in his career. In Low A he limited the opposition to a .197 average. The big area of concern is his inability to find the strike zone. He normally goes above 4.5 walks per nine innings. Until he finds more consistency finding the strike zone his major league debut could be delayed, but expect it to happen sometime in 2021.

AL East Lower Round Draft Pick Success

Wednesday, December 25th, 2019

Major league baseball and the minor leagues are feuding over the number of minor league baseball teams to support in 2021. The major leagues want to upgrade facilities, increase the pay of minor league players and also lesson the number of players they draft for the minor leagues. In other words, lower their costs.

If they draft fewer players they will not need as many minor league teams or scouts to draft and scout minor league players. With the rise in analytics there are probably those that say the cost of drafting players below the 25th round is not worth the expense. So myworld will take a look at players drafted after the 25th round who made it to the major leagues. We began with the 1998 draft when the number of players was reduced to 50 each round, and later 40. Myworld did not include any players who were drafted after the 25th round but did not sign who may have been drafted later in their career during an earlier round and made the major leagues. We did not really look at players drafted after 2015 since most of them will still be playing in the minor leagues.

Baltimore Orioles

Kurt Birkins OF/LHP (2000/33rd round) - 6-4, 5.85, 60 games all but two in relief
Oliver Drake RHP (2008/43rd round) - 10-8, 4.19, 185 games in relief
Zach Davies RHP (2011/26th round) - 43-32, 3.91, 111 starts
Donnie Hart LHP (2013/27th round) - 2-0, 3.13, 98 games in relief

Boston Red Sox

Dennis Tankersly RHP (1998, 38th round) - 1-10, 7.61, 27 games
Dan Giese RHP (1999, 34th round) - 1-8, 4.22, 35 games
Kasen Gabbard LHP (2000, 29th round) - 9-7, 4.53, 34 games/31 of those starts

Mauricio Dubon SS (2013, 26th round) .274, 4, 9 in 30 games

New York Yankees

Brandon Claussen LHP (1998, 34th round) - 16-27, 5.04, 58 starts
Sean Henn LHP (2000, 26th round) - 2-10, 7.42, 64 games
Phil Coke LHP (2002, 26th round) - 22-27, 4.19, 407 games of relief
Justin Berg RHP (2003, 43rd round) - 0-1. 4.08, 60 games relief
Mike Dunn LHP (2004, 33rd round) - 34-26, 4.00, 555 games relief

Brandon Laird 3B (2007, 27th round) .197, 5, 11, 53 games, but having a good career in Japan

Tampa Bay Rays

Chad Gaudin RHP (2001, 34th round) 45-44, 4.44, 344 games/87 starts
Zac Rosscup LHP (2009, 28th round) 5-2, 5.16, 116 games in relief

Edgar Gonzalez SS (2000, 30th round) .255, 11, 51, 193 games
Joey Gathright OF (2001, 32nd round) .263, 1, 96, 81 stolen bases in 452 games
Kevin Kiermaier OF (2010, 31st round) .249, 68, 235 and 89 stolen bases in 680 games

Tampa Bay Rays

Erik Kratz C (2002, 29th round) - .205, 31, 101 in 316 games
Kevin Pillar OF (2011, 32nd round) - .261, 76, 318 in 851 games
Rowdy Tellez 1B (2013, 30th round) - .241, 25, 68 in 134 games

Minor League All Stars for AL East

Thursday, November 28th, 2019

Baseball America lists their all stars for each classification, AAA, AA, etc. Some prospects do not stay long enough in some leagues to even be considered as an all star. Other players have gaudy numbers but their tools may not support continued success in the major leagues. Below is the list of all stars in the AL East and myworld’s comments.

Baltimore Orioles

Zac Lowther LHP (AA) - myworld saw him pitch at Bowie and came away impressed. He was hitting 95 on the radar but at Bowie that can be a bit inflated. He has an innings eater build and he put up some good numbers. The opposition hit only 197 off him, he struck out more than a hitter per inning and he finished 13-7. The Orioles need to develop some winners in their organization.

Grayson Rodriguez RHP (Low A) - The Orioles first round 2018 pick dominated at Low A. The opposition hit him at .171, his slider/fastball combo was swing and miss (129/94 whiff/walk) and he was 10-4. He should be at AA next year.

Boston Red Sox

Trevor Kelley RHP (AAA) - A sleeper as a 36th round pick in 2015. The Tar Hell has a sidearm delivery that was a mystery to AAA hitters who batted just .216 against him. He finished with a 1.79 ERA and 12 saves. One of the Red Sox big weaknesses was bullpen, but when called up twice Kelley struggled (8.64 ERA), failing to throw strikes and getting hit at a .290 clip. His fastball has minimal velocity so he has to rely on command and deception for success.

Jarren Duran OF (High A) - The seventh round pick in 2018 has the speed to create havoc on the basepaths and steal hits in the outfield. The bat was totally unexpected as he hit .387 with a .543 slugging in High A. He also stole 18 bases in 50 games. A promotion to AA did not produce the same kind of offensive numbers (.634 OPS) so the jury is still out on his major league success. He could become a fourth outfielder that is used for his speed and defense.

Gilberto Jimenez OF (SS) - Another speed guy who signed for only $10,000 out of the Dominican Republic. A small frame that does not carry a lot of power, but he hit .359. Like Duran he needs to continue to show the bat and he will play.

Jorge Rodriguez LHP (SS) - A lefty signed out of Mexico for the bargain basement price of $37,500. Not a hard thrower but he shows command. Got six starts and five relief appearances (1.91 ERA) and got lots of swings and misses (58/47 whiff/walk). Next year will be his debut in full season.

New York Yankees

Canaan Smith OF (Low A) - A fourth round pick in 2017 showed a bit of pop with 11 homeruns and hit for average at .307. He lacks the speed to play center so if he slots in the corner the power will have to build. His 32 doubles could provide a glimpse that those gappers could carry as he matures. Good patience at the plate with 74 walks (.405 OBA).

Ezequiel Duran 2B (SS) - The Yankees mine the Dominican well, and Duran may be a bargain at $10,000. His bat seems to be explosive with 13 homeruns and a .496 slugging. There is still a little too much swing and miss to his game which left his average down at .256 and his defense will not get him to the major leagues. Expect him to get an opportunity in full season next year.

Tampa Bay Rays

Brendan McKay LHP (AAA) - In college the first round 2017 pick was noted more for his bat than his arm. The Rays drafted him as a two way player and it was his arm that got him to the major leagues. For his six starts in AAA he finished with a 0.84 ERA. In 13 minor league starts he was 6-0, 1.10 ERA. That success did not follow when promoted to the major leagues (5.14 ERA). His bat shows power, but barely stayed above the Mendoza Line (.200).

Joe Ryan RHP (High A) - His overall stuff does not shout out super prospect, but he can hit 95. His numbers at High A were impressive with 1.42 ERA and 112 whiffs in 82.2 innings. Opponents hit him at only a .161 clip. He did get three starts in AA with some success. He needs to improve on his secondary offerings if he hopes to achieve continued success as he rises higher. A bullpen spot could be in his future.

Wander Franco SS (Low A) - A super stud. Many think he is the top prospect in baseball. He had an easy time at Low A (.318) and even an easier time in High A (.339). He had a 56/35 walk/whiff ratio so he makes contact. His defense is compatible for short but he is still a couple years away.

Greg Jones SS (SS) - The Rays 2019 first round pick has Wander ahead of him at short. He did not show any problem in his major league debut hitting .335 with 19 stolen bases in 48 games. Speed is his game so a move to center field would make sense. A .413 OBA with 22 walks in 48 games shows leadoff possibilities.

Edisson Gonzalez RHP (SS) - The Panamanian is now a Blue Jay, traded for Eric Sogard in September. At 5′10″ Edisson is not an imposing pitcher, but he did whiff 77 in 62 innings. A career 2.72 ERA Edisson will probably settle into a bullpen role.

Toronto Blue Jays

Nate Pearson RHP (AA) - The first round 2017 pick has a triple digit fastball that sits in the upper edges of the 90s with a devastating slider. Nate made the overall all star team, but not a specific classification level though his 16 starts and 2.59 ERA were well deserving. Arm issues had the Jays be conservative with his innings (62.2). He should be an ace for the Jays rotation. Nate should make his major league debut in 2020.

Griffin Conine OF (Low A) - The son of Jeff could be a grinder like his father. A second round pick in the 2018 draft, Griffin is not blessed with super star tools, but he did manage to hit 22 homeruns. He also struck out 125 times in 80 games. He has the arm to play right but the lack of speed may force a move to first.

Adam Kloffenstein RHP (SS) - The third round 2018 pick has a good pitcher’s frame at 6′5″. He could chew up innings as he develops. His fastball zips across the plate in the mid-90s. Opponents only hit .205 against him in short season.

Top Ten Centerfield Prospects

Thursday, November 7th, 2019

These are the players that will cover the ground east and west, north and south. Any players included in the top ten leftfielders or rightfielders are not included here.

1. Luis Robert (White Sox) - As an 18 year old Luis dominated the diluted Cuban professional league for half a season before defecting, recognizing there were greater treasures to the north. The White Sox validated that by signing him to a $26 million bonus in 2017, one of the signings that forced major league baseball to put a hard cap on international signing bonuses. Robert has some impressive tools. His one weak area is an average arm, otherwise he would be a five tool superstar. He also was a bit injury prone his first season in the states, limiting him to just 48 games. During that time he failed to hit a homerun in 180 at bats. That changed the next year when his health allowed him to play 122 games, slugging 32 homeruns and hitting .328. He may one of the top five minor league prospects in baseball. He handled AAA pretty easily as a 22 year old. Expect him to be with the White Sox in 2020.

2. Jo Adell (Angels) - Jo was a first round pick of the Angels in 2017. He is currently playing for the United States national team in the Premier 12, competing against professional players from other countries. This could test his readiness to play in the major leagues. It will also make up for games he missed last year due to injuries. Jo did work his way up to AAA where he hit just .264. The five tools are there to be an impact player. Filling the centerfield spot currently occupied by Mike Trout could be a stretch, but the arm is there to move to right field where he would show off gold glove defensive tools. He should make his debut sometime in mid-2020 after he tunes up his tools a bit more in AAA.

3. Christian Pache (Braves) - Christian was signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2015. The glove shows gold glove potential, with sprinter’s speed to cover lots of real estate. The bat is a bit of a question mark, with a poor walk to whiff ratio. Last year he was 43/122. Major league pitchers could exploit that inability to wait for good pitches to hit. The power has increased with 36 doubles and 12 homeruns. Despite his speed he does not steal a lot of bases. While the arm is plenty good for right, the bat does not quite fit there. Major league teams prefer players with a little more pop there. Christian could be ready for a major league callup next year, especially if the Braves want to shore up their outfield defense.

4. Drew Waters (Braves) - Drew was a second round pick in 2017. His tools also fit for centerfield, though his speed falls short of Pache. Despite his slower speed he seems to be a bit more aggressive stealing bases with 23 in 2018 and 16 last year. His arm is not as strong as Pache, but he puts enough velocity on the ball to have the ability to shift to right field defensively. Like Pache, his power is limited to the gaps. Last year he hit 40 doubles and 9 triples with just seven balls leaving the yard. Eventually, the Braves may have to trade one of the two centerfield prospects for help in other areas. Drew is ready to make his major league debut next year, but needs to improve his ability to make contact. Last year he struck out 164 times in just 134 games, a downgrade from his ability to make contact in 2018.

5. Taylor Trammell (Padres) - The Reds drafted Trammell with the 35th pick in 2016. He won MVP honors in the 2018 Future’s game, hitting a triple and a homerun. Last year the Reds traded Trammell to the Padres in the middle of the season in a three team trade that got them Trevor Bauer. The speed is there to cover lots of ground in centerfield. The arm may be a bit short for a move to right. There is some pop in his bat, but last year he struggled to make contact, dropping his average to .234. Entering the 2019 season it was .284. He may need to spend another year in AA to work out the kinks in his bat, but if he finds the zone expect him to find a spot in the Padres outfield next year.

6. Jasson Dominguez (Yankees) - At 16 Jason is a little young. The Yankees signed him for $5.1 million in 2019. Currently he has the speed to play centerfield, but that could change as he fills out. The bat has the potential to hit for power and the arm will easily fit in right field. Time will tell whether he becomes a star or fades into obscurity. He is about three to four years away from Yankee stadium.

7. Monte Harrison (Marlins) - The Brewers drafted Monte in the second round of the draft in 2014. He was used as bait for the Brewers to entice the Marlins to trade Christian Yelich to them. Harrison has gold glove potential on defense. Last year his season was ended early after a diving catch caused a fracture in his left wrist. What has been holding Monte back from making a major league contribution is his inability to make contact, resulting in low batting averages. If he can improve his contact the speed/power combination could make him a 20/20 player in the major leagues. An injury prevented him from making his major league debut last year. Expect him to make that appearance in 2020.

8. Jordyn Adams (Angels) - Jordyn was the Angels first round pick in 2018. By the time he is ready for the major leagues Mike Trout could have lost enough speed to force a move to a corner. If not, Jordyn may have to move to left field because of a weak arm. The Angels have a surplus of talented outfielders in Brandon Marsh, Jo Adell and Mike Trout. Jordyn has the speed to outrace them all. The big separator is whether his bat will be strong enough to fit in the outfield. He is still about three years away from the major leagues. With his speed and the patience at the plate to take a walk Jordyn could be the ideal leadoff hitter once he makes the major leagues around 2022.

9. Travis Swaggerty (Pirates) - Nobody has more swag than the Pirates first round pick in 2018. Travis helped himself by being one of the better players for Team USA. He may not have the explosive tools as Adams and Pache, but the speed is there to cover ground in center. The bat could also carry enough power to shift to right field. Last year he could only send 9 balls over the fence for a less than inspiring .381 slugging average. That carried him to High A. This makes his major league debut to occur sometime in 2022. Myworld expects his power numbers to reach 30 plus homeruns.

10. Leody Taveras (Rangers) - Leody is another player whose range in the outfield is strong enough to win gold gloves. The Rangers signed him in 2015 for a $2.1 million bonus. While the glove has been there, his bat has been lacking. His young age in each of the leagues he plays in could be a culprit in that. Last year he hit .279 between High A and AA. This is a vast improvement from his batting averages the prior two seasons. There will not be a lot of power in his bat, so sticking in center would be the best thing for him. He is still a couple years away from the major leagues.

Top Right Field Prospects

Friday, November 1st, 2019

These players lack the burner speed to play centerfield but have the strong arm to get the ball home or to third base with some juice. They also are good enough with the bat that they can provide run production.

1) Heliot Ramos (Giants) - Heliot Ramos was a first round pick in 2017 by the Giants. The Puerto Rican slugger had a solid year last year, showing the power potential in his bat with 13 homeruns and a .500 slugging percentage in High A. He slumped a bit when promoted to AA, his slugging percentage dropping to .421. His swing and miss is a little high, averaging a little over one whiff per game. As he fills out his speed will decrease making him a liability in centerfield. The arm is there for him to slide over to right. The Giants have never been good about developing outfielders. Heliot should change that, with an arrival time expected in 2021.

2) Jarred Kelenic (Mariners) - The Mets drafted Jarred in the first round, as the sixth pick in 2018. They sacrificed long term wealth for short term benefit by trading him and a package of other prospects to the Mariners for Robinson Cano and Edwin Diaz. Neither veteran panned out and Jarred is looking to be a superstar. He has all five tools with the speed to play center, but with the arm to shift to right. Last year he displayed his power with 23 homeruns at three different levels. With his 20 stolen bases he became a 20/20 player, a feat he should easily accomplish once he makes it to the major leagues. Since he played 21 games in AA expect an arrival time of 2021.

3) Jesus Sanchez (Marlins) - Another five tool talent, Jesus signed with Tampa Bay for $400,000 out of the Dominican Republic. The Rays shipped him off to the Marlins for Nick Anderson and Trevor Richards, two players who will not come close to reaching the level of Sanchez. It makes you wonder what the Rays saw in Sanchez that they traded him for what appears to be low cost. As he gets bigger (6′3″, 230) his speed will tap down, making a potential move to right field inevitable. The power exists for him to hit for at least 20 plus homeruns per year, but he did not show that last year. Even in the rabbit ball of AAA he could not slug for higher than .440. The Marlins do not have any outfielders in their major league system to prevent Jesus from winning a starting job. Expect that process to begin next year when he competes for an outfield job in spring training.

4) Estevan Florial (Yankees) - Estevan is Haitian born, but went to school in the Dominican Republic. The Yankees signed him for $300,000 in 2015 after he was suspended one year from signing for using a false name. Florial had a break out year in 2017 slugging 13 homeruns, but a broken hamate bone in 2018 forced him to miss two months of the season. He struggled a bit in the Florida State League, hitting just .255 with only a .361 slugging average. His season was again limited last year with a broken wrist and when he got to play his numbers were again disappointing in his third season in the Florida State League. The five tools are there to be an impact player but an inability to make contact puts his numbers down. Next year he should see AA. The Yankees have a surplus of outfielders in their system, but like Florial they struggle to stay healthy. If he can stay injury free he should make his Yankee debut in 2021.

5) Brandon Marsh (Angels) - The 2016 second round pick is not a flashy player. The speed is lacking to play centerfield and the power from his 6′4″ frame has yet to emerge. There is still too much swing and miss in his game, though he managed to cut it back in 2019. An ankle injury limited him to just 96 games last year. Despite his average speed and the ankle injury he was able to steal 18 bases. A .428 slugging average is evidence that he has yet to tap into his power. With Trout in center and outfielder Jo Adell rated as the Angels top prospect, the Angels can be patient with Marsh and allow his power to develop in AAA. The earliest he will be an Angel is 2021.

6) J.J. Bleday (Marlins) - Myworld saw a bit of Bleday’s power in the College World Series. The 2019 first round pick also has a rocket for an arm. His 27 homers were instrumental in Vanderbilt winning the College World Series. After being drafted as the fourth pick he went on to hit three more homeruns in the pitcher friendly Florida State League. Bleday does not have the speed to play center. He does make pretty good contact for a power hitter. With the Marlins in rebuilding mode, Bleday should be a fast riser. Expect him to reach AA in 2020 with a possible major league debut in 2021. There is 30 to 40 homerun potential in his bat.

7) Sam Hilliard (Rockies) - Hilliard is a 15th round pick in 2015 who lacks the speed to play centerfield. It doesn’t prevent him from stealing bases. He had his second year of stealing over 20 bases and slugging at least 20 homeruns. His lowest stolen base total in his four minor league seasons is 23. Last year his power numbers went through the roof with 35 homeruns and a .558 slugging percentage. That resulted in a promotion to Colorado where he added seven more homeruns to put him over 40 with a .649 slugging. The Rockies have a number of young outfielders competing for spots, but none hit for his power. Expect him to compete for the starting right field job in 2020. The one concern was his 164 whiffs in AAA, though he seemed to make more consistent contact when promoted to the major leagues.

8) Khalil Lee (Royals) - Khalil is a third round pick in 2016 that is blessed with all five tools. The speed was especially apparent in 2019 with 53 stolen bases. The arm is built for right field and the legs can cover center. Many teams considered drafting him as a pitcher, but for now he is patrolling the outfield. Khalil’s biggest challenge is making contact, which depresses his average and prevents him from showing off his power. Last year he struck out 154 times, limiting his average to .264 and his slugging to .372 in AA. Next year he should make his major league debut for the rebuilding Royals sometime after the All Star break.

9) Austin Hays (Orioles) - Injuries have prevented the third round 2016 pick from replicating his 2017 season. He had the right field position sewn up in 2018 but injuries and a poor season prevented a callup. Injuries again limited him in 2019 but he put up better power numbers (.464) in AAA that led to a promotion to the major leagues. There he shined with a .304 average and .574 slugging. This should make him the favorite to win the right field job next year, with Trey Mancini moving to first base.

10) D.J. Peters (Dodgers) - Myworld loves his power. We hate his inability to make contact. Last year the 2016 fourth round pick struck out 168 times in just 125 games, while slugging 23 dingers. At 6′6″ he has a large strike zone, but get those hands extended with the barrel of the bat making contact and that ball will go a long way. The arm is good for right field and he has the speed to be a solid defender, perhaps as a lesser version of an Aaron Judge. Yasiel Puig is gone but Cody Bellinger and Alex Verdugo appear to be ahead of him in right field. His best bet may be to be traded to give him an opportunity to play. At 23 years of age and in AAA his time is now. He should make his major league debut in 2020.

Top Venezuelan Prospects in the American League

Friday, July 12th, 2019

It is pretty clear that the Dominicans have the top prospects in baseball. Cuba is a distant second. The prospect wave from Venezuela has gotten smaller because of the humanitarian crisis there, but there are still enough players filtering out of the country to break it down into the two leagues, American and National. This list was put together before the season started so we are not influenced by their numbers this season. Six of the ten players in the American League are pitchers, something you would not see from the Dominican Republic, where they like to hit themselves off the island.

The players who graduated from the list created last year are Gleybor Torres, who was number one and Franklin Barreto who was number three. Barreto has not really won a full time job with the Athletics yet but is getting another opportunity to play with the major league club. A number of players dropped off the list as new players earned a spot to the higher rankings

1. Brusdar Graterol RHP (Twins) - Last year he missed making the top five. This year he is the best Venezuelan prospect in the American League. At 6′1″ he is not a big guy but his fastball sits at the lower end of the high 90s. He has two breaking pitches with the slider the most effective of the two. His change still needs some work. If he can improve his command and does not face durability issues he will fit in the starting rotation. If the change never develops or he has trouble staying healthy to stick in the rotation he could be used as a closer. This year he is limiting the opposition to a .188 average in AA. Last year he had success at the two A levels. His strikeout numbers are not impressive but he does get a lot of ground ball outs. Expect to see him in a Twins uniform before the season is done. He did miss the 2016 season because of Tommy John surgery and has yet to pitch more than 102 innings in a season.

2. Franklin Perez RHP (Tigers) - Franklin was signed by the Astros in 2014 for $1 million. The Astros traded him to the Tigers as the primary player in the Justin Verlander trade. Since arriving with the Tigers Franklin has had trouble staying healthy. The pitches are there with a fastball reaching the mid-90s, two above average breaking pitches and a change that is good. Last year he only pitched 19 innings because of a lat strain and shoulder issues that cropped up after his return from the lat strain. This year he has gotten two starts and has thrown less than 10 innings. At one time he was the top pitching prospect with the Tigers, but Casey Mize, Matt Manning, Alex Faedo and Beau Burrows are all surpassing him. Perez still has the nastier stuff, but you have to pitch on the mound in order to show that stuff.

3. Jose Suarez LHP (Angels) - The Angels always seem to be short of pitchers. At 5′10 and 225 pounds Jose would not give one an impression that he is a pitcher if you saw him at the grocery store. The left handed arm does not throw an overpowering fastball, usually sitting in the low 90s. His ability to control the fastball and mix in an excellent change up makes his fastball play better. His breakout season came in 2018 when he went from High A to 17 starts in AAA, which rose him into the top ten on this list all the way to number three. Success followed him in 2019 (3.18 ERA) which led to a promotion to the major leagues. There his lack of stuff proved less mysterious to major league hitters who spanked him at a .273 clip, while the minor league bats could only hit .200. If you are looking for a number five pitcher for your rotation Jose could be your man. If you want better pass him by.

4. Kevin Maitan 3B (Angels) - Kevin was once considered a superstar when he first signed with the Braves for $4.25 million. He was allowed to leave as a free agent because the Braves were involved in illegal international signing discretions. Once he was declared a free agent the Angels swooped in and signed him for $2.2 million. His superstar status has now slipped and now there are questions of whether the bat will play for him to reach the major leagues. His lack of range forced a move from shortstop to third base. The bat carries enough power to play third base, but the swings and misses and soft average (.214) does not allow that power to show up with much frequency. He still is only 19 years old but Ronald Acuna and Gleyber Torres were in AAA at 20 years of age and Maitan is still swinging and missing in A ball. This needs to be his break out season if he wants to make a similar jump.

5. Luis Oviedo RHP (Indians) - Luis signed for a generous $375,000 in 2015. He has a good pitcher’s frame (6′4″) and a fastball that sits in the mid-90s. That will keep him on prospect lists. His secondary pitchers are good enough to keep him in the rotation and he throws strikes. If he can improve one of his breaking pitches and the change he could climb from a back or mid rotation starter to a number two starter. He has yet to throw more than 63 innings in a season but last year was his most successful one. He did get two starts in Low A and walked seven in just nine innings. This year he has already reached 83 innings in Low A with numbers that are not impressive (5.40 ERA, .244 average) but he is getting the work in. Don’t expect him to rise too quickly. He needs to find consistent success at the lower levels before they consider him for the majors.

6. Darwinzon Hernandez LHP (Red Sox) - Darwinzon is another big guy at 6′2″ and 245 pounds who must watch his conditioning if he hopes to continue his career playing baseball. Back in 2013 the Red Sox signed him for just $7,500. As the years passed his fastball was hitting the high 90s and the swings and misses were becoming more prevalent, putting him on the prospect radar. He has the breaking pitches and the change to make it in the starting rotation. What he lacks is the ability to throw the ball across the plate or hit his spots in the strike zone. That is one reason he might be best used in the bullpen. Despite his lack of success in the minor leagues this year (5.04) the Red Sox promoted him to the major leagues where he had one start and one appearance in relief. Finding the strike zone was still a challenge with six walks in just 5.1 innings resulted in an ugly 5.06 ERA. The Red Sox bullpen is a little erratic so he may be called up again to help out in the pen if he can show strike one is not a difficult pitch to make.

7. Luis Rengifo 2B/SS (Angels) - The Mariners signed Rengifo for $360,000. He was traded to the Rays where the Angels acquired him just before spring training 2018 for C.J. Cron. With the Angels he climbed up their minor league system hitting over .300 in High A and AA putting him in AAA where he hit .276. Luis does not offer a lot of power but he makes contact with a 75/75 walk to whiff ratio in the minor leagues last year. Luis does not have great speed but it was good enough to swipe 41 bases last year. After hitting .273 this year in AAA the Angels had a need for a middle infielder. With the Angels he has played most of his games at second base with the remaining games at shortstop. Luis is best used as a utility infielder. The tools are a little light to be a starter.

8. Luis Arraez 2B (Twins) - Base hits seem to come easy for this Luis. He lacks power and the speed is below average but his hits seem to find the grass. His career minor league average entering the 2019 season was .329 with a 98/114 walk to whiff ratio. Because of his lack of tools in other areas he will need to keep on finding the grass to stick in the major leagues. He missed all but three games of the 2017 season because of ACL surgery but came back last year to hit .310. This year he abused AA pitchers with a .342 average. A promotion to AAA did not phase him as he continued to hit (.348). No balls travelled over the fence in his more than 200 at bats, but it got him a promotion to the major leagues. There he hit .393 in close to 100 at bats, including two homeruns. The return of Marwin Gonzales from the disabled list and the hitting of Jonathan Schoop complicates his status as a major leaguer. But any hitter who has a .976 OPS in 100 at bats deserves a spot in the major league lineup. In the minors his walk to whiff ratio is 24/15 while with the Twins it was 10/8.

9. Bryan Mata RHP (Red Sox) - The Red Sox found another bargain when they signed Bryan for $25,000. At 6′3″ he has a nice pitcher’s frame. Adding some weight could put some more mustard on his low 90s fastball, allowing it to sit consistently in the mid-90s. Last year finding the strike zone was a bit of a challenge with 58 walks in just 72 innings at High A. He doesn’t get a lot of swings and misses but he limited the opposition to a .229 average. This year the Red Sox started him in High A where he seemed to locate the strike zone for just 18 walks in 51 innings and a 1.75 ERA. He was rewarded with a promotion to AA where in two starts the strike zone has gotten a little more elusive. If Bryan can locate the strike zone again the Red Sox could promote him this year to help in the bullpen. If not, you could see him late in 2020.

10. Everson Pereira OF (Yankees) - The Yankees signed Everson for $1.5 million in 2017. There is the potential for a borderline five tool player here. The arm rates as average but all the other tools are impressive. Last year the Yankees brought him up to rookie ball where as a 17 year old he was able to hit .263. There were a lot of strikeouts in his game (60 whiffs in 41 games) but the potential is there. This year he is playing in the New York Penn League, hitting .171 with a .257 slugging percentage. It will be a struggle early in his career but the Yankees have plenty of outfield talent to wait for him. Don’t expect to see Pereira in a Yankee uniform until September 2021 at the earliest.

Football or Baseball in London

Sunday, June 30th, 2019

If you were told the score of the game was 17-13 you would have thought it was a football game played in England in the middle of the summer. If you saw that two teams had scored “6″ in the first you would have thought two teams had each scored a touchdown and missed the extra points or had kicked two field goals and it was quarters you were talking about, not innings. But it was baseball they played in London and the Yankees defeated the Red Sox 17-13.

The game lasted four hours and 42 minutes, the second longest major league game in history. It missed being the longest game by three minutes. That game was also played by the Red Sox and Yankees. Ironic that baseball was brought to England because it was a faster game than cricket, which has been known to take a couple days to play one game.

The attendance was just short of 60,000 at London stadium, a cricket field turned into a baseball field. Myworld doesn’t know what the site lines were for the game but with all that action who really cares. Only six times in major league history, or at least since 1912 have two teams combined for 12 runs in the first inning. The 37 combined hits are the second most in a Red Sox/Yankees game since 1908. So there was a lot to see at the game.

It had a little international flair to the game too with Japanese pitcher Masahiro Tanaka getting the start for the Yankees. He did not last past the first inning. It would have been nice to have honored all those major league players born in England. Most of those players were born prior to World War II so there are not many of them. Players who were born in England after 1950 who played major league baseball are:

Danny Cox
Paul Marak
Lance Painter
Chris Reed
Phil Stockman

There are enough there to make a basketball team, but not enough for a major league baseball team. The second game is today. Let’s hope this one is more representative of what baseball should be.

Forbes List of Top Paid Baseball Players

Thursday, June 13th, 2019

Soccer players are the top three salaried athletes on the Forbes Top 100 Highest Paid Athletes list. The process was to figure out a player’s salary or winnings and endorsements, add them up and come up with their 2019 earnings. The one difficulty with that is the endorsements were based on publicly identified endorsements or word of mouth by talking with representatives about the worth of those endorsements. So the list may not be totally accurate.

Soccer takes the first three, a boxer is number four, tennis at five, football takes 6-7, basketball dominates 8-10 and golf is at 11. You have to go to the 17th spot to find your baseball player. Only one woman makes this list and she plays tennis. Myworld will force you to go the Forbes list to get the names of the above listed athletes associated with their sport.

For baseball, endorsement money was a small portion of their value. I’ll list the endorsement money for the top three, but after that it was under $1 million.

17. Mike Trout (Angels) - $56 million ($3 million in endorsements)
23. Bryce Harper (Phillies) - $44.5 million ($6.5 million in endorsements)
30. Manny Machado (Padres) - $34.8 million
50. David Price (Red Sox) - $31.7 million
54. Clayton Kershaw (Dodgers) - $30 million
61. Justin Verlander (Astros) - $29.5 million
62. Yoennis Cespedes (Mets) - $29.4 million
63. Miguel Cabrera (Tigers) - $29.2 million
68. Jake Arrieta (Phillies) - $28.8 million
73. Albert Pujols (Angels) - $28 million
77. Giancarlo Stanton (Yankees) - $27.4 million ($2 million in endorsements)
84. Felix Hernandez (Mariners) - $26.6 million
94. J.D. Martinez (Red Sox) - $25.6 million
96. Joey Votto (Reds) - $25.4 million

Stat of the Week

Sunday, June 9th, 2019

Baseballsavant.com carries some interesting statistical numbers. Last week we listed the top ten players for speed. Some of the names surprised us. This week we list the top ten players in exit velocity on average and distance to see how they marry. Not too many surprises here.

Exit Velocity

1) Joey Gallo (96.3) - Having a career year in batting average (.276) with 17 homeruns.
2) Nelson Cruz (94.5) - At 38 years of age his homerun numbers are going down, but it appears he still hits the ball hard.
3) Josh Bell (94.4) - Having a career year with 18 homeruns and leading the NL in RBIs (57).
4) Christian Yelich (93.8) - Gunning for another MVP award with 23 homeruns leading major league baseball.
5) Gary Sanchez (93.4) - A good bounce back year for him with his 19 homeruns already exceeding last year’s totals in less at bats.
6) Shohei Ohtani (93.3) - He can still throw the ball harder than he hits, but that exit velocity is still impressive.
7) Josh Donaldson (93) - The flyer the Braves took on him signing him to a big one year contract is paying off
8) Franmil Reyes (93) - One of the best young hitters in baseball. Staying with the big boys with his 19 homeruns
9) Carlos Santana (92.9) - Not changing his evil ways against American League pitchers. Homerun numbers are down (12).
10. Yoan Moncada (92.9) - Finally reaching his number one prospect potential. Also only 12 homeruns but a .284 average.

Tommy Pham just missed the top ten at number 11 with an average exit velocity of 92.8.

The top ten in average homerun distance has some surprise names because some of the players on the list have not hit a lot of homeruns. So myworld took a look at the average distance a player hits the ball and the top ten from that list:

1) Gary Sanchez (236) - He appears in our top ten exit velocity.
2) Jay Bruce (233) - He has blasted 18 homeruns but a low batting average indicates a lot of soft contact in his game.
3) Anthony Rendon (229) - They call him Tony Two Bags because of all the doubles he hits into the gaps.
4) Joey Gallo (227) - Number one on our exit velocity list
5) Jorge Polanco (225) - Not noted for his homerun pop but lots of doubles this year. His 10 homeruns is approaching his career high of 13.
6) Justin Smoak (222) - Seems to be having a quiet year with a .237 average and only 12 homeruns and 6 doubles.
7) Mike Trout (220) - About time this superstar appears somewhere on this list.
8) Daniel Vogelbach (219) - We never saw his major league homerun production coming.
9) Brandon Belt (218) - His offensive numbers seem to be down. Perhaps a lot of fly ball outs to the warning track.
10) Cody Bellinger (216) - If not for Yelich he would be gunning for the NL MVP honors. A NL league leading .362 average

As far as distance, the top five homeruns for distance have been hit by Nomar Mazara (482), Ketel Marte (482), Keon Broxton (474), Josh Bell (474) and Mike Trout (473). Marte and Broxton are two interesting names I wouldn’t associate with power, though Marte has been hitting some homeruns this year.

A lot more interesting stats at baseballsavant.com. Hope to give you more next week but you can check the numbers yourself.

Top Cuban Prospects in the American League

Tuesday, May 28th, 2019

Not a lot of graduation from the list compiled last year. Lourdes Gurriel graduated, but his minor league time is still not finished as he struggles with his defense. Myworld has always felt he is better suited for the outfield. The bottom three players fell from the list and one player from the National League moved to the American League leaving room for three new players.

1. Luis Robert OF (White Sox) - He has the five tools to make him an All Star. The White Sox hope those tools stand out in the major leagues after shelling out $26 million in 2017. The White Sox signed Jose Abreu to a $10 million bonus and a six year contract reaching $68 million. Robert has the speed to play centerfield with an arm capable of playing right. Last year the power did not show in an injury ravaged season, but this year he has already clubbed 10 homeruns in 41 games. He dominated High A pitching with 8 homeruns in 19 games. AA pitching has been a bit more of a challenge (.488 slugging). The one concern with Luis is his inability to take a walk and a high rate of striking out (10/42). After hitting .453 in High A he is still hitting an acceptable .274 in AA. An outfield of Eloy Jimenez and Robert could be special. If he continues to have success expect a September promotion if they can find 40 man roster space.

2. Yordan Alvarez 1B/OF (Astros) - Robert has more tools, but Alvarez has game changing power. Last year injuries limited him to 88 games but he still slugged 20 homeruns. The Astros have tried to fit him in left field but his defense is poor. A lack of speed makes his range below average. His arm is also better suited for left. This year he has already matched his 20 homerun output of last season, and he has only played in 47 games. The Astros had acquired Alvarez from the Dodgers for Josh Fields. The Dodgers had signed Alvarez to a $2 million bonus in 2016. Triple A no longer seems to be a challenge for Yordan so expect the Astros to find some room for him on their major league roster by mid-July.

3. Yusniel Diaz OF (Orioles) - The Dodgers had signed Yusniel for $15.5 million in 2015, then traded him to the Orioles in the Manny Machado trade. His first half season in Bowie was a disappointment (.239), showing a lack of power. His defense is better suited for right field so he needs to hit to fit in a corner outfield position. There is power in his bat, though that has been slow to appear in games. He is repeating AA and his current average (.225) is lower than last year at Bowie and his power is lacking (.225/.338). He needs to hit for power if he hopes to fit as a rightfielder.

4. Julio Pable Martinez OF (Rangers) - The Rangers have Shohei Ohtani to thank for the signing of Martinez. They traded for extra international signing money in the hopes of signing Ohtani, but when he decided to sign with the Angels the Rangers had some money to spend. The Rangers spent $2.8 million to sign him. The speed exists to play center, but his arm can play right and his potential power is ideal for a corner. His first year he played in the Rookie Leagues. This year he has graduated to High A where he is struggling to hit for average (.156). Strikeouts can also be a problem with 62 in just 45 games. This will slow his rise up the minor league ladder. With a hot streak he could become a September callup, but like most prospects they will have to release a player to make room on the 40 man roster.

5. Lazaro Armentaros OF (Athletics) - He came from Cuba with a lot of hype. The Athletics signed him for $3 million and once he got on the field the Athletics discovered all his warts. For one, his arm is not strong, better suited for left field. He also has trouble making contact, whiffing 115 times in just 79 games. This could impact his ability to hit for a high average as he rises up the minor league ladder. This year that is proving true with his .224 average. The power is slow to appear with 9 homeruns in 45 games. This surpasses the 8 homeruns he hit in 79 games last year. At 20 years of age the Athletics have plenty of time to show patience. Don’t expect him in the major leagues until around 2021.

6. Rogelio Armenteros RHP (Astros) - He was signed for $40,000 back in 2014 as a 19 year old. This year he has repeated AAA after going 8-1, 3.74 ERA last year. His fastball can be dialed up to the mid-90s, usually sitting in the Low 90s, but it is his changeup that is his swing and miss pitch. His breaking pitches still need a lot of refinement. His spot on the 40 man roster provides him an opportunity to pitch on the major league roster if a need develops. He must first improve on his 1-4, 5.73 ERA. The opposition is hitting him at a .299 pace. He is a starter in the minor leagues but the Astros can still use him in relief.

7. Cionel Perez LHP (Astros) - Cionel is more than a lefthanded finesse pitcher. The Astros originally signed him for $5 million but then reduced that amount to $2 million when a medical review provided some concerns on his elbow. So far it has stayed intact since his 2016 signing. His fastball can light the radar guns in the high 90s, but usually sits in the mid-90s. The Astros have been using him in relief as well as starting so the velocity is much greater if used out of the bullpen. His breaking pitches are solid but his change needs some work. That may put him in the bullpen. Last year he made his major league debut, pitching 8 games in relief. Command was a problem with 7 walks in 11 innings. This poor command has repeated itself in AAA with 20 walks in just 32 innings, upping his ERA to 6.19. Not finding his spot has also resulted in an ugly .296 opposition average. If he wants to see himself in the major leagues in 2019 he needs to get out of his lack of command funk.

8. Osiel Rodriguez RHP (Yankees) - The first new player on this list. The Yankees signed him for $600,000 in 2018. He will not turn 18 until November but he already shows a fastball that hits the lower portion of the upper 90s, but sits in the low 90s. He has lots of arm angles and lots of pitches with a slider, change and curveball that will all see improvement as he rises up the minor leagues. Osiel will not make his debut in the minor leagues until the rookie/short season leagues start.

9. Diosbel Arias SS/3B (Rangers) - He was teammates with Julio Pablo Martinez on the 18 and under Cuban national team. When the Rangers signed Arias for $700,000 in 2017 they reunited him with Martinez. His tools are not as strong as Julio. His lack of range may make shortstop a stretch but his lack of power will make third base a bad fit. His best bet may be as a utility player ala his countryman aledmys Diaz. His batting average since his signing is .373. He makes contact but lacks the speed to be a threat on the base paths. This year his average is .306 in High A. He is still a couple years away from thinking about the major leagues.

10. Raynel Delgado SS (Indians) - Delgado was born in Cuba but came to the States as a seven year old. The Indians selected him in the sixth round of the 2018 draft out of high school. A lack of speed limits his range for short and his arm is weak, so a move is a strong possibility. His bat should hit for a decent average but he has yet to make his minor league debut. The power could develop for a move to third or he could make it as a utility player. There are miles to go before he even sniffs the major leagues.