Archive for February, 2018

Myworlds Top 100 Prospects - 40 - 31

Saturday, February 24th, 2018

Myworld continues our top 100 list.

40. Kolby Allard LHP (Braves) 5.6 - The Braves have traded for a number of pitchers who were number one picks for their team. Kolby was a number one pick for the Braves in 2015. His velocity is not impressive (high 80s to low 90s) so his command needs to be good for him to have success. Last year at AA was his first year his whiffs per 9 innings fell below 9 and his opposition average was .258, with lefthanded hitters having greater success hitting him (.292). He still kept his ERA low (3.18) relying on an above average curveball and change to enhance his fastball. Because the Braves chose to skip High A he was one of the younger pitchers in AA so his success was impressive. AAA could be his destination in 2018 or he could repeat AA. Wherever he pitches he is just a stone’s throw away from the major leagues. His lack of velocity will always make him a back of the rotation starter.

39. Juan Soto OF (Nationals) 5.62 - Injuries limited the talented outfielder to just 32 games last year. After two seasons his career minor league average sits at an impressive .362 with an OPS of .953. This could be one of the reasons the Nationals were hesitant to trade Soto. While his bat is pretty impressive his defense could limit him to left field because of a less than spectacular arm. He still has not grown into what should be impressive power. Despite the limited playing time because of injuries the Nationals should start him in High A to begin the 2018 season. He will still be a teenager when playing at that level.

38. Franklin Perez LHP (Tigers) 6.1 - The prized prospect the Tigers obtained from the Astros for the trade of Justin Verlander. At 6′3″ with the ability to hit the mid-90s with his fastball, those are attributes that teams drool over with lefthanded pitchers. Prior to 2017 he was striking out more than a hitter per inning. The 2017 season saw him fall below that, though at High A he limited the opposition to a .190 average. His excellent command and plus curveball are his strengths. Getting more consistency with his change will make him a major league pitcher. The Venezuelan only started six games in AA so that is probably where he will begin the 2018 season. The Tigers have an impressive group of starters percolating up their minor league system. If they all can stay healthy it will be an impressive rotation with Franklin leading the charge.

37. Mike Soroka RHP (Braves) 6.16 - The Canadian lacks velocity, his fastball sitting in the low 90s. Quality secondary pitches and good command allow him to achieve soft contact with the bats. His strikeout numbers will never be impressive but he has limited hitters to a .239 average. His big challenge is retiring lefthanded hitters, who battered him for a .269 average. The 2015 first round pick should start the 2018 season in AAA with a major league mid-season callup a possibility. His 6′4″ height gives him good downward plane on his pitches.

36. Sixto Sanchez RHP (Phillies) 6.16 - The Dominican has a fastball that can hit triple digits, which creates comparisons to Pedro Martinez because of his small stature (6′0″). The Phillies signed him in 2015 for only $35,000. Despite the velocity on his fastball he does not miss a lot of bats (6.5 K’s per 9 innings in High A). This could be because his secondary pitches are a work in progress. His command is excellent as he has yet to hit double digits in walks at any level he has played and he has only given up two homeruns in his 175 innings of pitching. He had some rough five starts in High A so myworld expects that will be where he begins his 2018 season, getting a promotion mid-season if he has success there.

35. Willie Calhoun 2B/LF (Rangers) 6.18 - The power was slow to develop early in the year. By the time the season ended he had 32 homeruns, including one in the major leagues. At 5′8″ he would not strike you as a hitter who could hit for power but he has had back to back seasons of 27 plus homeruns. Prior to being drafted he led all junior college hitters in homeruns with 31. The Dodgers traded him to the Rangers in the Yu Darvish loan. His one big weakness is with the glove. The Dodgers used him mainly at second base with a thought to move him to left field. The Rangers will try him out in left. His arm is not strong and DH is probably his best position. With a good spring he could start the season with the Rangers in left field.

34. J.P. Crawford SS (Phillies) 6.4 - J.P. is one of those players whose physical tools are impressive but the numbers fail to match those tools. The Phillies traded Freddy Galvis to the Padres at the beginning of the year to hand the shortstop job to him. The 2013 first round pick committed 17 errors at short in AAA, but none at the major league level where he played third, short and second. The bat has been a little disappointing, especially last year where he struggled to make contact. J.P. can be a very patient hitter, walking 95 times between AAA and the major leagues. There is no stolen base speed in his legs, but if he can hit and draw walks he could fill a leadoff role with the Phillies. The shortstop job is his to lose in 2018.

33. Brendan McKay LHP/1B (Rays) 6.54 - Shohei Otani got most of the publicity for being a two way player but McKay along with Hunter Greene were two players who hit and pitched in the minor leagues. McKay has a lefthanded fastball that can hit the low 90s with a plus breaking pitch. Last year he achieved six starts with the opposition hitting him at a .149 clip. His lefthanded bat has the potential to hit 20 plus homeruns. The 2017 first round pick lacks the speed to play any place other than first, DH or pitcher. He should start the 2018 season in full season ball (Low A) where the Rays will continue the experiment of letting him hit and pitch until he consistently fails at one of the skills.

32. Kyle Wright RHP (Braves) 6.6 - The 2017 first round pick is the third Braves pitcher on this list. At 6′4″ Kyle has a beast of a fastball with excellent movement that can slice the plate in the mid-90s. In his 9 starts, six of them at High A he limited the opposition to a .186 opposition average. With four quality pitches Kyle is a good fit to pitch at the top of the rotation. The Braves could have him start the 2018 season at AA but myworld suspects he will begin the season at High A.

31. Scott Kingery 2B/3B (Philles) - Scott started the season with a homer barrage in hitter friendly AA. As the season progressed his homer barrage slowed. He hit 18 in 69 games in AA then finished with 8 in 41 games at AAA. Most of his time was spent at second base, but he did play some short and third. Expect a power drop in 2018, which could make third base an unattractive spot for his pop. The second round 2015 pick is not a quality defensive player but he will not embarrass you. If Maikel Franco continues to struggle at the plate Kingery could take over for that position. A good spring could give him an opportunity to travel with the Phillies to begin the season.

The Hoisting of the White Flags Tarnishing Pennant Races

Friday, February 23rd, 2018

It used to be that when you entered spring training almost every team had hopes that they could compete in the pennant race. That was then. This is now. A new building block has been created for creating playoff caliber teams. It is called tanking.

Baseball tends to be a copycat league. Ever since the Cubs built the blue print of tanking and building up through high draft choices created by 100 loss seasons, other teams have followed. The Astros won the World Series last year using that blue print. Now there are a number of other teams who are following the blue print.

What is the harm in this approach? Major league baseball has at least 11 of their 30 teams going through a rebuilding process. This will result in few pennant races and probably at least three 100 win teams who spend their day beating up on those teams that would have 100 losses if there were not so many other poor teams in a rebuilding stage. This will result in a drop in attendance and a lessoning of interest in a season that many already feel drags on too long.

The teams in the rebuilding process are: Tampa Bay Rays, Kansas City Royals, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Oakland Athletics, Miami Marlins, Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres. A couple of those teams are in the final stages of their rebuilding effort and could be more competitive. In other words, you will have perhaps five expansion teams and six weak teams battling for the first round pick.

Other teams who probably should rebuild because their rosters are so weak with a number of players ready to become free agents in a year: Baltimore Orioles, Toronto Blue Jays, Seattle Mariners, New York Mets and San Francisco Giants.

This leaves only 14 teams who have some hope of competing in the playoff race. More teams will be out of the playoff race before the season starts than teams who have slight hopes of a playoff season. This has also created a thin market for free agents. If you have no interest in competing for a playoff spot, why would you choose to spend a lot of money to sign a free agent? You may look for a bargain player that you hope to trade later on once he proves his worth. Taking on a high salary is out of the question. Some agents have misread the free agent market. There may not be enough teams in the market willing to bid for the available free agents out there.

Next year myworld sees the Baltimore Orioles and perhaps a couple other teams to be added to the tank brigade. It makes no sense to spend a large salary on a mediocre team. Cut salary, finish at the bottom, collect some revenue and then in three to four years use that savings to sign free agents. By then the collective bargaining contract will expire, the players will be pissed by the lack of signings and you can see discontent entering the bargaining process. So not only will major league baseball have sagging attendance, but they will have some angry ballplayers upset with the money tanking owners are making because of low salaries at the expense of a number of players forced to sign minor league contracts, or sitting out the season because of a lack of offers.

Trouble awaits.

Cuba and Japan Complete Honkball Itinerary

Friday, February 23rd, 2018

The six teams have been selected for Honkball. It will be played July 13-22 at Pim Mulier Stadium in Haarlem. Haarlem is one of those quiet, pleasant cities that have more bikes on the roads than automobiles. It also has canals, windmills, a town square and a baseball stadium. The stadium is just a couple miles from the town square. Myworld could not pick a better spot to relax in a tranquil setting and then spend your time at the ballpark.

The six teams participating in the tournament are:

Netherlands, Curacao, Italy, Taiwan, Cuba and Japan

After the last Honkball tournament there was some discussion to end the tournament. The crowds are loyal with fans waiting two hours inside the stadium waiting for the second game to be played. When you buy a ticket it is for the day, with the first game scheduled for 2 PM and the evening affair for 7 PM. There is a tented area and a stage for a band, so if the crowd is large enough a band could be made available to entertain those who wait the couple hours inside the stadium for the second game to start.

Despite the decent crowds the organizers were not able to collect enough revenue to continue the tournament. Lack of advertisers and sponsors are the large revenue generators for most tournaments. Another group has stepped in to hold the tournament. Hopefully they will be more successful in continuing the tournament every two years.

United States New Number One

Friday, February 23rd, 2018

With their win in the World Baseball Classic the United States has ended the three year reign of Japan and taken over the number one spot in baseball, according to the World Baseball and Softball Confederation (WBSC). With the top 12 teams qualifying for the Premier 12 in 2019 myworld will list the top 13 teams as ranked by the WBSC. Mexico sitting at number five has never been ranked higher.

1. United States (5025 points)
2. Japan (4609 points)
3. South Korea (4158 points)
4. Cuba (3152 points)
5. Mexico (2613 points)
6. Taiwan (2520 points)
7. Canada (2142 points)
8. Australia (2095 points)
9. Netherlands (2002 points)
10. Puerto Rico (1796 points)
11. Venezuela (1765 points)
12. Dominican Republic (1227 points)
13. Nicaragua (1155 points)

You can see the complete list at wbsc.org/rankings/

Reds Are in the Final Stages of Rebuilding Process

Wednesday, February 21st, 2018

The Cincinnati Reds are in the final stages of their rebuilding process. This means they have traded all their viable, healthy veteran players for prospects and now are in the process of waiting for those prospects to develop. Some of them have already reached the Reds. Others will filter through this year. The Reds hope it will only take a couple more years before these prospects give the Reds a playoff run.

The best of the bunch is their 2016 first round pick Nick Senzel. While he played some shortstop in college the Reds felt his larger frame would do better at third base. At short he would just be an ordinary defender while at third he could become a gold glover. That thinking has shifted as the Reds are considering the idea of giving him an opportunity to play short. The loss of Zack Cozart to free agency has opened up a position for a younger player, thought to be Jose Pereza. Senzel has some good power for a shortstop but normal for third base. He also has the ability to hit for average, hitting .340 in 57 games at AA. This would be an upgrade over Peraza, who has more speed but very little power. Last year Senzel spent his whole season playing third base so some AAA tuning at short would be ideal before they throw him out to the major leagues.

The Reds have been waiting for Cuban prospect Alfredo Rodriguez to develop into a major leaguer. His defense is major league quality but his bat is a bit short, with very little power to even spray the gaps. He was 23 when he played in High A ball but his slugging percentage was only .294. The 2018 season will see him in AA where he is just a phone call from the major leagues, but if his bat fails to even slice the ball through the gaps it will be hard to see him get the call. The Reds were hoping he would be the shortstop of the immediate future, but now doubts have clouded his status.

The Reds dished out a $5 million bonus on another Cuban shortstop defector last year. He signed too late to play any games last year. On the Cuban national team he played second base but the Reds think he has the arm to play short. He has the speed to cover ground and the arm to make a line drive throw to first deep in the hole. The bat is a bit of a mystery but it is not expected to show a lot of power.

Alex Blandino was a first round pick of the Reds in 2014 as a shortstop. His stock has dropped as his bat has struggled to make an impact and his below average defense has forced a move to second base. Last year his .270 batting average in AAA, combined with his .444 slugging has brought a little spark to his prospect status. At 26 years of age his time is now to reach the major leagues.

The Reds minor leagues is stocked with outfielders, led by the toolsy Taylor Trammell. The 2016 first round supplemental pick had the speed to steal 41 bases at Low A. It will also allow him to cover a tremendous amount of real estate in centerfield. His arm is solid for right field. Last year the power began to show with 13 homeruns and 77 RBIs. The 2017 season should see him as a run producer in High A.

Jesse Winker should see a platoon role with the Reds next year. Last year he slugged seven homeruns in 47 major league games, slugging .529. The lefthanded hitter did not hit badly against lefthanders in AAA (.280) but struggled in the major leagues (.120). His defense is very below average so if he is not hitting and being a productive part of the lineup he does not belong in left field. Like Kyle Schwarber his best bet may be to be traded to an American League team where he can DH.

Jose Siri had a breakout season power wise for the Reds last year in the lower minor leagues. The Dominican hit a career high 24 homeruns in Low A while also stealing 46 bases. He did have the propensity to swing and miss (130) without drawing a lot of walks (33). This doesn’t seem to have hurt his batting average (.293). The speed and power are there to make him an impact player. First he must rise up the Reds minor league system, beginning his 2018 season in Low A. This puts him at least two years from the major leagues.

The Reds have been waiting a long time for slugger Aristedes Aquino to pan out. His speed allows him to play centerfield, but it does not allow him to be a prolific base stealer. His arm is one of the best in the Reds system so right field may be his final spot. The power in his bat has combined for 40 homeruns the last two years, but last year his average dropped to .216. His ability to make contact suffered last year (145 whiffs) dropping him down the prospect ladder. With their outfield surplus in the minor leagues the Reds may be wise to keep him at AA to begin the 2018 season.

Phil Ervin, the Reds 2013 pick has virtually disappeared from the prospect radar. He did make his major league debut last year, hitting .259 with three homeruns. His speed has garnered double digit stolen bases but his power has failed to materialize. His best bet would be to make the Reds as a fourth outfielder who can play all three outfield positions.

The top pitching prospect in the Reds system, who many teams thought about drafting as a shortstop, is Hunter Greene. The Reds had him play shortstop and pitching, making three starts early in his season and finishing his time at short. Because of the demands of throwing at short and the two different throwing motions the Reds felt it was too risky to use him as a two way player. At 6′4″ the first round 2017 draft pick can hit triple digits with ease with his fastball, sitting in the high 90s. What is scary is that this velocity could tick up as his body matures. His secondary pitches need more consistency since he did not need them much pitching against high school hitters. The Reds may keep him in extended spring before promoting him to Low A around May,

The Cuban Vladimir Gutierrez also has a plus fastball that reaches the mid-90s. He left Cuba in 2015 so it has been two years since he last pitched. Despite his velocity he was very hittable in High A (.267) with a strikeout rate of only 8.21. When he pitched in Cuba he was used out of the bullpen so his secondary pitches are a bit undeveloped. Last year he started 19 games, working 103 innings. Next year he will put those innings to work in AA.

Tyler Mahle had a breakout season last year. The seventh round 2013 pick was virtually unhittable in AA (1.59 ERA and .190 opposition average) in 14 starts. This earned him a promotion to the Reds where he pitched well (2.70) in four starts but suffered with his command with close to five walks per nine innings. His fastball sits in the low 90s but can ride towards the plate in the mid-90s. At 6′4″ he has a good pitcher’s frame. With a good spring the Reds hope he can earn a spot in their rotation to start the 2018 season.

Rookie Davis was the big acquisition in their trade of Aroldis Chapman to the Yankees. His stuff appears to be very pedestrian with a less than awe inspiring fastball despite his 6′5″ frame. The Reds called him up last year for six starts and he was assaulted for a 8.63 ERA. He was also punished for seven homeruns in just 24 innings. At best the Reds can hope for a back end of the rotation starter or an arm that can be used in the bullpen.

Myworlds Top100 Prospects - 50-41

Friday, February 16th, 2018

Big volleyball tournament this weekend. May be our last post until Tuesday so we thought we’d whittle the Top 100 list today.

50. Jake Bauers 1B/OF (Rays) 4.36 - A sleeper pick not drafted until the seventh round of the 2013 draft, Bauers shows patience at the plate walking 70 plus times at the plate the last two seasons. His power has yet to show at the plate but he has been one of the younger players in the league level each year he is promoted. The power could come as he matures. In the meantime it sits at .412, which is not acceptable for a first baseman. He is an above average defensive player at first base but the Rays put him in the outfield for 24 games to increase his versatility. His below average arm and minimal speed makes him a liability in the outfield when that glove could be used at first base. The Rays appear to be in a rebuilding mode so with a good spring Bauers could see significant time at first base in 2018.

49. Michael Baez RHP (Padres) 4.38 - The Cuban professional league is noted for their lack of flame throwers on the island. That is because most of them have defected for a shot in the major leagues. Baez is one of those players. The Padres signed him for $3 million after seeing his fastball touch the high 90s and sit in the mid-90s. His secondary pitches need to develop more consistency (slider, curve and change) but that should come with time. Prior to signing him the big criticism was his inability to find the plate. That did not seem to be a problem in his first season stateside, walking only 8 in 59 innings while striking out 82. He also gave up 8 homeruns so he needs to learn throwing one ball to walk a batter to take one base is better than throwing down the middle and watching the hitter circle the bases. The 2018 season should see him pitch in full season ball.

48. Anthony Alford OF (Blue Jays) 4.62 - Another athletically gifted player who played football in college while he dabbled in baseball has now chosen to focus on baseball. It was expected that his tools would allow him to climb the ladder fast to reach the major leagues but Alford has had trouble staying healthy. The power and speed are there for him to make an impact offensively, possibly becoming a 30/30 player. Defensively he covers major real estate in center field, though his arm is best suited for left if he had to find another outfield position. He made his major league debut last year but broke his wrist five games later. A good spring could see him crack the Blue Jays opening day roster, but they may prefer to begin his season in AAA where he has only accumulated 12 at bats.

47. Cal Quantril RHP (Padres) 4.98 - Another son of a major leaguer finding himself on the Top 100 list. His father Paul was a reliever in the major leagues. Currently Cal is a starter who sits in the upper brackets of the low 90s with his fastball. What makes his fastball more devastating is an excellent change that keeps hitters off balance. Last year he seemed a little more hittable with AA hitters tagging him for a .296 average and his whiff rate falling down to 7.2 per nine innings. Same side hitters were particularly cruel hitting .336 against him. The Padres drafted him in the first round of the 2016 season despite Tommy John surgery preventing him from pitching an inning during his junior year at Stanford. Expect him to start the 2018 season in AA and with success getting a shot at the major leagues.

46. Luis Urias SS/2B (Padres) 5.1 - Normally players start as shortstops and move to second base. Luis started at second base and showed he had the arm to play short. His bat has minimal power but he can spray the gaps. The potential is there for him to hit consistently north of the .300 barrier with the speed to take extra bases. That speed appears to be lacking when attempting to steal. In his last three years he has been thrown out 37 times with only 33 stolen bases. The skills are there for him to be a middle infield type utility player if he doesn’t make it as a starter at one of the positions. Career wise he draws more walks (153) than whiffs (135) a rarity in this day and age. After his success at AA Luis will start the season at AAA with a major league calling just around the corner.

45. Kyle Lewis OF (Mariners) 5.2 - Kyle was expected to be a special player but a devastating knee injury at the end of his debut year limited him to just 49 games last year. When playing in the Arizona Fall League his participation was cut short because of concerns with the knee. The 2016 first round pick was the Baseball America College Player of the Year with the potential to be a five tool player. Last year he only saw 21 games in the outfield so it will be interesting how his knee has impacted his speed and ability to cover ground in center. The arm is solid enough to shift to right. The Mariners skipped him to High A after 11 rehab games in Rookie ball last year. That should be where he starts his 2018 season. If the knee proves healthy he could be moved up quickly.

44. Jack Flaherty RHP (Cardinals) 5.42 - The possibility exists for the 2014 first round pick to make the starting rotation with a good spring. Jack started five games for the Cardinals last year with minimal success. Poor command (4.22 walks per nine) and a .284 opposition average resulted in a 6.33 ERA. The 6′4″ righthander has the ability to hit the mid-90s with his fastball with complementary secondary pitches that should make him successful as a starter. Jack was dominating at AA (1.42 ERA) and AAA (2.74 ERA) so his major league struggles could be attributed to acclimating his stuff to major league hitters.

43. Ryan McMahon 3B/1B/2B (Rockies) 5.46 - The Rockies second round pick in 2013 played third base in his early years in the minor leagues. With Nolan Arenado entrenched there that position seems off limits. The Rockies have tried him at second and first. At second his defense is shaky but his bat could make up for his defensive struggles. He is better defensively at first base but that position is a bit crowded with other possibilities. The Rockies had to find a position for him after he hit .374 with 14 homeruns in 70 games, producing a 1.023 OPS. That got him a callup to the majors where he struggled (.158) in a brief 19 at bat major league debut. A good spring could see him win a job with the Rockies but his best bet is to go to AAA as depth and get a callup when needed.

42. Leody Taveras OF (Rangers) 5.48 - We wrote about him yesterday in the top Dominican prospect list so the following is just a cut and paste from that list. Leody has the defensive tools to be a gold glove centerfielder with a strong arm and lots of speed to cover a wide area of green. His bat should produce but Leody still has not matured into his body yet, a teenager playing at Low A. When he fills out he could become a 20/20 player, making enough contact to fill the leadoff role but also having the power to hit in the three spot. The Rangers will show patience with him, promoting him to High A next year. Ranger fans will probably have to wait until 2019 for a major league September callup and then 2020 to see him in the starting lineup more regularly.

41. Franklin Barreto SS/2B (Athletics) 5.58 - The Athletics hope Barreto makes an impact since he was one of the players they acquired from the Blue Jays for Josh Donaldson. The other players the Athletics acquired in the trade, Brett Lawrie, Kendall Graveman and Sean Nolin have fallen short in their return. Barreto made his major league debut last year and hit just .197 in his 25 games. He does show the ability to hit for pop and has shortstop tools but could move to second in deference to Marcus Semien. Last year he made 18 errors in 83 games at short, a little too erratic for major league purposes. His lifetime minor league average is .292 which is where he should hit once he gets more acclimated to major league pitching. A good spring could see him on the Athletics roster in a utility role but expect him to be depth at the AAA level.

Top Dominican Prospects in American League

Thursday, February 15th, 2018

You can see the 2017 list at the link at the end of this blog. The only graduates from the list were Rafael Devers, the number 3 prospect and Reynaldo Lopez at number 7. A couple players dropped off, number two Francis Martes, number eight Francellis Montes and number nine David Paulino. That leaves five repeaters and five new players added to the list, one of whom appeared on the National League list last year.

1. Eloy Jimenez OF (White Sox) - Eloy was the fourth top Dominican prospect from the National League list last year. He climbs to the top with his trade from the Cubs to the White Sox. The expectation is that when Eloy is ready he will come with 30 plus homerun power. Last year he hit 16 at High A between the two franchises, but really took off at Winston Salem with a .346 average and a .682 slugging. This resulted in a promotion to AA where his hitting continued with three more homeruns and a .353 average. A below average arm may make his best fit left field. His legs lack the speed for center, though they are adequate running the bases. Expect him to start the 2018 season in AA and if he continues to rake the White Sox will find room for him in their outfield.

2. Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 3B (Blue Jays) - His father was voted into the Hall of Fame this year. Everyone wants to compare him to his father. The arm is not as strong and he lacks the propensity to swing at everything as his father did. There was some question as to whether he could hang at third but he seemed to dispel those rumors showing average defense. He may not carry his father’s power, but the power is beginning to emerge with 13 homeruns between Low and High A. He has also shown patience at the plate with a 76/62 walk to whiff ratio, evidence that he has the same ability to make contact as his father, he just waits for better pitches to hit. This will benefit him as he rises up the minor league ladder, hitting AA in 2018.

3. Francisco Meija C (Indians) - Last year Francisco made a name for himself with a 50 game hitting streak and a .342 average. The numbers were not quite as glamorous as last year but he still hit .297, .352 against lefthanders. That got him a promotion to the major leagues where he struggled with a .154 average in 13 at bats. He has an arm that can stop a running game but needs to work on some of the other subtleties of the catching game, i.e. framing pitches, calling the game and preventing passed balls. He did show some power last year with 14 homeruns and a .490 slugging percentage. Since he did not play any AAA last year the Indians may start him there but if Yan Gomes continues to struggle with the bat Francisco could be called up. The Indians also worked with Francisco a little at third base, which could be another option to get his bat in the lineup and leave Gomes behind the plate.

4. Willy Adames SS (Rays) - He was at the top of this list last year but fell not because he had a bad year but the three above him had good years. Willy has the tools to play short for the Rays in 2018 and could fill that position with a good spring. His bat will hit for decent power, hitting at the lower ends of the double digits in homeruns. The gaps will be peppered with his line drives resulting in about 40 doubles per year. If he made better contact he could fit at the top of the order but he may be better suited in the six or seven slot. The Rays acquired Adames from the Tigers back in 2014 in the David Price trade and may finally be getting some reward for it four years later.

5. Leody Taveras OF (Rangers) - The first real new player on the list since Jimenez appeared on the National League list. Leody has the defensive tools to be a gold glove centerfielder with a strong arm and lots of speed to cover a wide area of green. His bat should produce but Leody still has not matured into his body yet, a teenager playing at Low A. When he fills out he could become a 20/20 player, making enough contact to fill the leadoff role but also having the power to hit in the three spot. The Rangers will show patience with him, promoting him to High A next year. Ranger fans will probably have to wait until 2019 for a major league September callup and then 2020 to see him in the starting lineup more regularly.

6. Jorge Mateo SS/OF (Athletics) - The trade from the Yankees to the Athletics resurrected his career. Forced to be moved from short to second with the acquisition of Gleyber Torres and not being promoted to AA put a dent in his prospect status. He came to life in AA with Oakland hitting .292 with a .851 OPS. Jorge has sneaky power with the potential to hit in the double digits. He has yet to come close to his 82 stolen base year of 2015 but he was 13 for 16 in just 30 games at Midland. The Yankees had given Mateo some centerfield time but with Midland Mateo played all his 30 games at short. He could begin the 2018 season in AAA but a good spring would make it tempting to put him on the major league roster in a super utility role, i.e short, second and centerfield.

7. Jesus Sanchez OF (Rays) - Jesus has the potential to be a special player on offense. Coming into the 2017 season he carried a .332 average in the Dominican and Rookie Leagues. He got his first exposure to the full season league and hit .305. The power also began to show with 15 homeruns and a .478 slugging. Jesus has the speed to play center and the arm to move to right. The offense would be better served if his production could stay in center. Next year he will begin the season in High A with a promotion to AA if he should continue to rake.

8. Miguel Andujar 3B (Yankees) - The Yankees have choices for third base. With the trade of Chase Headley they could move Gleyber Torres there or Andujar. Torres may provide better defense but his natural position is shortstop. Andujar made 17 errors there between two levels and will have to reduce that number if he wants to make camp there. Torres is also recovering from arm surgery and may need some time in AAA to strengthen his arm. Andujar has the power for the position. blasting 16 homeruns last year with 82 RBIs. For a power hitter he made solid contact hitting over .300 at both AA and AAA, including a .571 average in a seven at bat trial with the Yankees. A good spring should earn Andujar a trip north with the Yankees as their starting third baseman.

9. Albert Abreu RHP (Yankees) - The Yankees have a couple of arms with flash rising up their minor leagues who hit the radar in triple digits. Albert is one of those arms sitting in the mid to high 90s. His secondary pitches are still inconsistent but he did a better job of finding the strike zone last year. Albert can overwhelm hitters with his heat but as he rises up the minor leagues his change and slider/curve need to improve for him to be successful as a starter. Last year at High A the opposition hit him at a .252 clip with 8.13 whiffs per nine innings. At the lower levels hitters were in the low .200s with more than 9 whiffs per nine innings. The Yankees could start Albert in High A to begin the season with a mid-season promotion to AA once he finds success.

10. Domingo Acevedo RHP (Yankees) - Another Yankee arm that slices the plate in triple digits, sitting in the mid to higher 90s. Domingo also has a plus change but needs to find a consistent breaking pitch. Domingo is a little more advanced than Abreu, starting last season at High A and jumping to AA before finishing with two starts in AAA. His best work was at AA (2.38 ERA). Control was a problem for him in AAA with 8 walks in 12 innings and in the Florida State League lefthanders seemed to tag him pretty well (.316). An improvement in his slider could change that. Acevedo could see some time in the Yankees rotation next year if he has success in AAA, where he should start the 2018 season.

Red Sox Prospects Trimmed for Playoff Runs

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

The Red Sox have a few promising prospects at the lower levels. The depth appears to be a little thin. Trades of Top 100 prospects Yoan Moncada and Michael Kopech debited their farm system. They were also penalized by MLB for usurping the international signing caps by pooling prospect salaries to get under the salary cap (on paper giving lessor prospects with the same buscone more money to sign the high level prospect to a below minimum salary bonus). The penalties have now limited the Red Sox ability to sign quality international players. A quick look at their top prospects shows a lack of international players, something they were noted for in year’s past.

The top prospect is perhaps Jay Groome, their first round pick in the 2016 draft. He is a left handed pitcher who stands 6′6′ with a mid-90s fastball and hard breaking curve ball. Character issues dropped him to the Red Sox. His large frame makes throwing strikes a challenge but he gets a lot of swings and misses (11.77 k’s per nine innings in Low A). He is still a couple years away from providing any contribution to the major league club so the Red Sox will have to be patient with his development.

Tanner Houck is another big dude to add to the Red Sox pitching staff. The 2017 first round pick stands 6′5″ with a mid-90s fastball that can click in the high 90s. His secondary pitches still need a lot of work but he still missed a lot of bats with his limited repertoire (10.07). The Red Sox limited his starts to less than three innings per start because of his college workload but he should begin the 2018 season in Low A. His large frame should allow him to eat a lot of innings if he can develop his other pitches.

Myworld likes Mike Shawaryn because he is a Maryland Terp. He is not overpowering with a low 90s fastball but his slider and change are plus pitches. The Red Sox were able to wait until the fifth round to draft him in 2016. In Low A he dazzled with 13.16 whiffs per nine innings and limited the opposition to a .222 average. A promotion to High A saw his walk numbers increase (3.87) while his swings and misses decreased (10.07) but he still limited the opposition to a .232 average. Next year he will see AA and how he does could determine his major league future.

The two best hitters could occupy the corners for the Red Sox in the next couple years, though Rafael Devers will be tough to beat out. Michael Chavis hits for power, combining for 31 homeruns between High A and AA last year. His defense at third is still a question mark, which could make for a crowded first base. He lacks speed to move to the outfield and not be a defensive liability. Sam Travis has a sweet righthanded bat that lacks power. This is not a good recipe for first baseman in the major leagues. His defense is above average, but with so many players competing for this spot the Red Sox could prefer more power. Like Chavis, Travis lacks the speed to move to the outfield and still be a defensive asset.

The only other position player worth noting is Tzu-Wei Lin who the Red Sox signed out of Taiwan for $2 million. They may have overpayed for him. His power is non-existent and his arm is a bit light to play shortstop full time. Lin does have some speed, but it does not result in stolen bases. He peppers the gap using that speed to turn a single into a double. Expect him to fill a utility role for the Red Sox with minimal offense expected from him. He filled that role for part of the season last year.

Myworlds Top 100 Prospects - 60-51

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018

We’re halfway there. So much more to write about after this, finishing up the team’s prospect lists, the mlb predictions and the top ten prospects from various countries. At some point we will get to all of it, but first finishing up the Top 100.

60. Yadier Alvarez RHP (Dodgers) 3.66 - The Dodgers have hung on to Alvarez after paying him a $16 million bonus in 2015 as a 19 year old. That is a lot of money for a pitcher who could not make Cuba’s 18 and under team because he could not find the plate. He did hit triple digits with his fastball and that was the start of the Dodgers attraction. They have him starting but he will probably end up in the bullpen because of undeveloped secondary pitches and his struggles finding the plate. He walked 6.82 hitters per 9 innings in his seven AA starts. There is still some time to improve his secondary pitches and be more consistent in finding the plate so the Dodgers will continue to use him in the rotation at AA to start the 2018 season.

59. Jay Groome LHP (Red Sox) 3.66 - Jay dropped to the Red Sox after some character issues scared teams away, allowing the Red Sox to make him their first round pick in 2016. At 6′6″ the lefty has a blazing fastball that hits the mid-90s with a plus curveball, traits teams seek for their ace in the rotation. He only pitched seven innings in 2016 so his big test came in Low A where he got 11 starts. He had trouble finding the plate (5.08) and retiring righthanders (.287) leading to an ugly 6.70 ERA. The Red Sox could give him a repeat of Low A to begin the 2018 season with an early season promotion to High A if he can find the plate more often.

58. Nick Gordon SS (Twins) 3.8 - The son of Tom “Flash” Gordon and the half brother of Dee Gordon lacks the speed of Dee but could have a better bat. Like Dee his power is minimal and his fielding at short needs to be more consistent. Last year he committed 19 errors in just 104 games at short. The Twins gave him some second base time as this could be his position of the future. The lefthanded hitter struggled against lefties last year (.174) and for someone who lacks power he swings and misses too much (134 whiffs in 122 games). A utility role could be in his future, especially if he continues to struggle against lefthanded pitching. The 9 homeruns he hit last year were almost double what he hit his first three years so some moderate power could be developing as he matures. The Twins could use him in 2018 for their playoff run but they will start him in AAA and wait for the perfect opportunity.

57. Jesse Winker OF (Reds) 3.88 - The 2012 supplemental first round pick of the Reds carries a mean stick but his best defensive position is probably at designated hitter. The power seemed to finally appear in the major leagues last year after he was limited to five homeruns in 191 AAA games. He slugged 7 in his 47 games with the Reds. Despite his below average defense in left field this could give him a platoon opportunity against right handed pitching. Jesse could only hit .120 against major league lefties, but even in AAA his batting average against lefthanders was 40 points lower than righthanders. If Jesse wants to find his name in the lineup the bat will have to produce to justify his limited defense in leftfield, and this includes hitting for power. The 2018 season should see him in a platoon role in left field. How long he keeps that role depends on a productive bat.

56. Alec Hansen RHP (White Sox) 4.08 - The 6′7″ right hander was a second round pick in 2016 out of Oklahoma. The college drafted pitcher with the high 90s fastball and mid-80s slider started the season in Low A and finished it in AA, having some success at each level. In Low A he limited the opposition to a .207 average with over 11 whiffs per nine innings in his 13 starts. High A did not phase him either with over 12 whiffs per nine innings and a .203 opposition average in 11 starts. In AA he was a bit more hittable (.333) but still struck out more than 14 hitters per nine innings in his two starts. For a tall starter he seems to find the plate well. Expect him to start the 2018 season in AA with a promotion to the White Sox if a need arises. The White Sox have a plethora of quality pitchers they can call on in the minor leagues to fill their rotation so Alec may have to bide his time.

55. Chance Adams RHP (Yankees) 4.12 - The 2015 fifth round pick has been a bit of a surprise for the Yankees. At 6′0″ his height could be a durability issue in the rotation, but he throws in the mid-90s with a wicked slider resulting in a breakout 2016 season (13-1, 2.33 ERA). That excellence continued last year in AA (1.03 ERA) and AAA (2.89 ERA). In AAA he limited the opposition to a .197 average in 21 starts. The Yankees have a number of potential starters in the minor leagues who they can use in their rotation so a good spring could get Chance an opportunity.

54. Taylor Trammell OF (Reds) 4.14 - An athletic outfielder who was the high school football player of the year in Georgia, Taylor decided to play baseball when the Reds drafted him as a supplemental first round pick in 2016. Taylor has blazing speed that will allow him to cover the outfield grass in center, but a below average arm which could limit him to left. His power began to show last year with his 13 homeruns and .450 slugging percentage in Low A. He also flew around the bases for 41 steals and 10 triples. The speed and patience to take a walk exists to fit in a leadoff role but as his power grows he could slide into the three hole. Taylor will try to build on his 2017 success in High A in 2018.

53. Justus Sheffield LHP (Yankees) 4.24 - Lefthanded pitchers who stand only 5′10″ are not frowned on as much as righthanders, especially when they hit mid-90s on the radar. The 2014 first round pick can also retire hitters with his slider and change, giving him three solid pitches for the rotation. Last year in AA he had some troubles retiring righthanded bats (.276) and his whiff rate was disappointing (7.91). The Yankees may find a need for him in the bullpen in 2018 to retire lefthanded hitters before fitting him in the rotation. Eventually he could fill a role as a three starter.

52. Jorge Mateo SS/OF (Athletics) 4.3 - The Yankees acquiring Gleyber Torres moved Jorge from the shortstop position while with the Yankees. He also had some disciplinary issues when he complained about not being promoted to AA. This resulted in a disappointing 2016 season where the Yankees eventually traded him to the Athletics for Sonny Gray. Returning to shortstop seemed to put some spice back in his bat, though the speed in his legs to steal over 80 bases in 2015 has yet to return. Jorge has some sneaky power that could get him into double digits with homeruns. The speed in his legs will turn some singles into doubles and doubles into triples. If he could find his stolen base speed Jorge could be an impact player, though he did steal 13 bases in 16 attempts in 30 minor league games with the Athletics. If the shortstop job is filled the Athletics could move him to centerfield, where his speed would play well there. Expect him to start the season in AAA with a major league callup in midseason a possibility. The Athletics have more holes in their positions than the Yankees.

51. Keston Hiura 2B (Brewers) 4.32 - The Brewers 2017 first round pick has an excellent bat. His defense is a question mark as a injured arm (sprained ulnar ligament) limited him to DH while playing college. The injured wing healed enough for him to play three games at second base, which could be his position in the majors (played outfield in college prior to the injury). The bat is what will separate Hiura, possibly batting title contention. He hit .436 in a 15 game debut in rookie ball and then .333 in 27 games in Low A. His power now is more geared toward the gaps but as he develops he could be a 20 plus homerun hitter who also hits north of .300. His 2018 season could start in High A with more time playing second base.

Brisbane Bandits Win Third Straight Australian Title

Monday, February 12th, 2018

The Bandits have completed a trifecta. After winning their first of three straight championships, beating the Adelaide Bite in 2015/2016, they followed that up by beating the Melbourne Aces. This year they defeated the Canberra Cavalry in a best of three series. Next on their agenda to beat in the finals would be the Perth Heat and/or the Sydney Blue Sox. That would give them five in a row against each ABL team. The Blue Sox may be tough since they are the only ABL team not to appear in the finals since the new format was started back in 2010.

Canberra won the opener 5-1 led by the 6.2 shutout innings from Brian Grening. He got offensive support from Robbie Perkins and David Kandilas, who each hit two run homers. The only run scored by Brisbane was in the ninth on a solo shot by T.J. Bennett. Little did Canberra know this would be the beginning of a trend in the second game.

Game two was not very competitive with Brisbane rolling over Canberra 12-2. Canberra scored both their runs on solo shots by Travis Witherspoon and Boss Moanaroa. Brisbane out muscled them with seven homeruns, Andrew Campbell and Chih-Shih Leng each hitting two homeruns, and Donald Lutz, Mitch Nilsson and David Sutherland each going deep. That is homeruns hit by players from four different countries, United States, Australia, Taiwan and Germany.

Tim Atherton pitched seven innings, allowing just one run on three hits while striking out 11 to get the win. Lake Bachar had a rough outing for Canberra. He lasted just two outs into the fourth inning, but five of the seven hits he gave up carried over the fence.

The final game was a bit more competitive. Brisbane scored three early runs on a three run shot from Adam Weisenburger in the second inning to take an early 3-0 lead. They made it 4-0 on a solo shot by Mitch Nilsson in the sixth. The fireworks would begin after that.

The veteran Travis Blackley pitched six innings of one hit ball for Brisbane. When he was removed in the seventh the Cavalry charged. As did the benches, with two bench clearing incidents happening in the sixth. Manager Dave Nilsson and his coach were removed after a caught stealing at second base led to a second benches clearing brawl. The first bench clearing occurred after a hit by pitch immediately following the Nilsson homer in the top of the sixth. The umpire ejecting them was Takahito Matsuda.

Sam Holland only faced one hitter before he was removed, giving up a single to Jay Baum. Ryan Bollinger got Boss Moanaroa to ground out to second. Baum was allowed to advance to second and scored on a throwing error by first baseman David Sutherland when he broke for third. That gave the Cavalry their first run.

In the eighth Kyle Perkins led off the inning with a homerun. Travis Witherspoon added a one out double but he was left stranded at third.

Steven Kent kept Canberra in the game by striking out all six hitters he faced. He also got credit for an out in the bottom of the sixth on a caught stealing attempt that led to the two ejections.

After going through four pitchers to get four outs Brisbane turned to Ryan Searle to finish the game. He retired five of the last six hitters he faced, giving up a two out single in the ninth to Robbie Perkins, but retiring the last hitter (Cameron Warner) to secure the Brisbane Bandits third straight championship.

CPBL Baseball Commissioner Chin-Yang Wu threw out the first pitch in the second game of the ABL championship. The CPBL is looking to expand and there are discussions of putting a team of Australian players in the CPBL as a fifth team.