Red Sox Prospects Trimmed for Playoff Runs

The Red Sox have a few promising prospects at the lower levels. The depth appears to be a little thin. Trades of Top 100 prospects Yoan Moncada and Michael Kopech debited their farm system. They were also penalized by MLB for usurping the international signing caps by pooling prospect salaries to get under the salary cap (on paper giving lessor prospects with the same buscone more money to sign the high level prospect to a below minimum salary bonus). The penalties have now limited the Red Sox ability to sign quality international players. A quick look at their top prospects shows a lack of international players, something they were noted for in year’s past.

The top prospect is perhaps Jay Groome, their first round pick in the 2016 draft. He is a left handed pitcher who stands 6′6′ with a mid-90s fastball and hard breaking curve ball. Character issues dropped him to the Red Sox. His large frame makes throwing strikes a challenge but he gets a lot of swings and misses (11.77 k’s per nine innings in Low A). He is still a couple years away from providing any contribution to the major league club so the Red Sox will have to be patient with his development.

Tanner Houck is another big dude to add to the Red Sox pitching staff. The 2017 first round pick stands 6′5″ with a mid-90s fastball that can click in the high 90s. His secondary pitches still need a lot of work but he still missed a lot of bats with his limited repertoire (10.07). The Red Sox limited his starts to less than three innings per start because of his college workload but he should begin the 2018 season in Low A. His large frame should allow him to eat a lot of innings if he can develop his other pitches.

Myworld likes Mike Shawaryn because he is a Maryland Terp. He is not overpowering with a low 90s fastball but his slider and change are plus pitches. The Red Sox were able to wait until the fifth round to draft him in 2016. In Low A he dazzled with 13.16 whiffs per nine innings and limited the opposition to a .222 average. A promotion to High A saw his walk numbers increase (3.87) while his swings and misses decreased (10.07) but he still limited the opposition to a .232 average. Next year he will see AA and how he does could determine his major league future.

The two best hitters could occupy the corners for the Red Sox in the next couple years, though Rafael Devers will be tough to beat out. Michael Chavis hits for power, combining for 31 homeruns between High A and AA last year. His defense at third is still a question mark, which could make for a crowded first base. He lacks speed to move to the outfield and not be a defensive liability. Sam Travis has a sweet righthanded bat that lacks power. This is not a good recipe for first baseman in the major leagues. His defense is above average, but with so many players competing for this spot the Red Sox could prefer more power. Like Chavis, Travis lacks the speed to move to the outfield and still be a defensive asset.

The only other position player worth noting is Tzu-Wei Lin who the Red Sox signed out of Taiwan for $2 million. They may have overpayed for him. His power is non-existent and his arm is a bit light to play shortstop full time. Lin does have some speed, but it does not result in stolen bases. He peppers the gap using that speed to turn a single into a double. Expect him to fill a utility role for the Red Sox with minimal offense expected from him. He filled that role for part of the season last year.

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