Myworld’s Top 100 90-81

This is a continuation of our Top 100 list, which is basically a ranking of five other top 100 prospect rankings and giving each player points based on where they were rated. The points were aggregated and then divided by five to get an average score. The Mets win this prospect ranking with two players ranked within this top ten.

90. Noelvi Marti SS (Mariners) - For a player who signed in 2018 and has seen nothing higher than the Dominican Summer League, this is an impressive ranking. In years past there would not be enough information on player’s who did not play state side, but in the age of the internet and videos passing information on skills sets it is now so much easier to evaluate players. Noelvi signed for $1.55 million. Speed could be the main part of his game but he shows some power that could make him a very intriguing player. In The DSL he hit .309, slugged 9 homeruns and stole 17 bases as a 17 year old. He has the tools to play short, but his speed would also be an asset in centerfield, so the Mariners have options. How he fills out as he matures could dictate his ultimate position. Next year he will start the season in extended spring, play in rookie ball and could get promoted to Low A before the season ends. He is at least three years away from fitting a major league uniform.

89. Francisco Alvarez C (Mets) - The Mets have not had a lot of success with young minor league catchers fulfilling their success in the major leagues. They hope this Venezuelan who signed for $2.7 million in 2018 will achieve success. Alvarez has massive hands and wide forearms built by helping his dad carry 90 pound concrete bags as a ten year old. Don’t know how those big hands will impact his catching behind the plate, but it has given him some power at the plate. Last year he played in the Rookie League and hit .312 with seven homeruns and a .916 OPS. His bat has the ability to hit for some big time raw power. The arm is strong enough behind the plate so if he can improve on the other areas of defense he should be fine. It takes catchers a little longer to develop so Francisco is still probably four years away from the Mets.

88. Shane Baz RHP (Rays) - Baz was a first round pick of the Pirates in 2017. When the Pirates had the hopes of making the playoffs they traded Baz to the Rays for Chris Archer. Now that the Pirates are rebuilding they would probably like that trade back. Baz can hit triple digits with his fastball but normally sits in the mid-90s. He has a plus slider that gets lots of swings and misses (87 whiffs in 81 innings) and a developing change that should keep him in the rotation. There is some inconsistency in finding the plate but that should improve with experience and more repetition. If he fails to harness his control there is always the option of the bullpen. Shane got 17 starts and was 19 innings short of 100. He should start the 2020 season in High A and work for a promotion to AA late in the season. This should prep him for a major league callup by 2021.

87. Simeon Woods-Richardson RHP (Blue Jays) - The Mets drafted Simeon in the second round of the 2018 draft. His fastball can carry readings in the lower etches of the high 90s and he has a big breaking curveball. Generally he will sit in the low 90s. His strikeout numbers were impressive (126/106 whiff to innings pitched) at High A and AA. In his six starts in the Florida State League he limited the opposition to a .182 batting average. With more success next year he could be pitching in AA, just a knock on the door to the major leagues. At 6′3″ he has good height to add more velocity to his fastball. One curiosity is how many letters the Mets will allow him for the back of his uniform.

86. Nick Solak OF (Rangers) - Not a typical player to be found in a Top 100 list. Nick was originally drafted by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft, traded to the Rays in a three team trade in 2018 and finally traded to the Rangers for a pitcher Peter Fairbanks, who was a 9th round pick of the Rangers in 2015. Solak got some major league opportunity last year hitting 5 homeruns and slugging .491. The Rangers used him both in the outfield and at second base. His arm is probably best suited for left field but his speed could allow him to fill in at center. Second base is his more natural position. His bat carries some pop with the Rangers motivated to promote him after he hit .347 with 10 homeruns in just 30 games after the Rangers acquired him from the Rays. He will compete for a major league utility job with the Rangers next year.

85. Jonathan India 3B (Reds) - India was a first round pick of the Reds in 2018. The last third baseman they drafted number one (Nick Senzel - 2016) they had to move to another position because of Eugenio Suarez filling the third base bag. Senzel has been injury prone the last couple years, but was considered to have better tools than India. As a college drafted player India should move quickly. Last year he blitzed through High A and AA, hitting .259 with 11 homeruns. That matches Senzel in his rise up the minor leagues, with Nick hitting more homeruns and producing better batting average numbers. India has some pop in his bat and the position versatility that he could be used as a utility player his first couple years with the Reds. Like Senzel, there is enough speed in his legs that he could get outfield time and play at shortstop. Next year he should start the season in AA but do not expect a callup until sometime in 2021.

84. Corbin Carroll OF (Diamondbacks) - The Diamondbacks have the luxury of going for it with a rich minor league system filled with tradeable prospects. The Diamondbacks used one of their many first round picks in 2019 to draft Carroll, selecting him 15th overall. Currently his hit tool exceeds his power, with his burner speed making him an ideal fit for centerfield. His power could develop more than gap power as he matures, but time will tell on that. Last year he stole 18 bases and slashed seven triples in just 42 games. Corbin drew enough base on balls to put his OBA above .400. He appears ideally suited for the lead off spot, but is not expected to see any major league time until 2023.

83. Ryan Mountcastle 1B (Orioles) - The million dollar question you have for Ryan is what glove do you give him. His arm is not adequate enough to play the left side of the infield and the outfield would be limited by his loopy throws. The Orioles like his bat where he went on to hit 25 homeruns in AAA. First base and DH are two of the crowded positions in the Orioles major league lineup so Ryan may have to continue mashing homeruns in AAA. Ryan was a first round pick of the Orioles in 2016 and at that time played shortstop. Next year he should make his debut with the Orioles.

82. Brady Singer RHP (Royals) - Brady was the top pitcher for the Florida Gators and fell to the Royals as the 18th pick in the 2018 draft when many felt he was a top five pick in the draft. The Royals chose to rest his arm and did not pitch him in 2018. This year he debuted his low 90s fastball with a devastating slide to minor league hitters. The numbers were rather pedestrian. He pitched well in High A (1.87) where he kept the ball on the ground. When promoted to AA batters hit more balls over the fence and he was rather pedestrian with his numbers (3.47 ERA). He gives up close to a hit for each inning pitched and falls below a strikeout for each inning pitched. The Royals were hoping to see more, but perhaps he will break out in his second season of minor league ball. The 6′5″ Singer is due to start the season in AA and could be ready to pitch for the Royals in 2020.

81. Ronny Mauricio SS (Mets) - Amed Rosario currently holds the shortstop job but has struggled with defense. Andres Gimenez is a defensive shortstop that lacks the bat of Rosario. And you have Mauricio, whose bat should hit for power and average, but at 6′3″ his body will out grow the position and eventually move to third. Ronny does not have good speed so even if the Mets chose to keep him at short he would be limited defensively. The Mets paid out $2.1 million to sign Mauricio in 2017. Last year he played in Low A with a 23/99 walk to whiff ratio an explanation for his .268 average. He will need to find more patience before finding major league success.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.