Myworld’s Top 100 - 70-61

Myworld continues to traipse through our top 100 list. Almost halfway there.

70. Nick Lodolo LHP (Reds) - Nick was the first round pick of the Reds in 2019. He was the first pitcher selected in the draft, having pitched three years for TCU. His fastball sits in the low 90s, but his 6′6″ frame makes it appear to arrive at the plate with greater velocity. Despite his large frame Nick showed impeccable control, not walking a hitter in his 18 inning professional debut. His secondary pitches, especially trying to find a consistent breaking pitch still need refinement, but it is still early in the pitching development time frame. As a college drafted pitcher his rise should come quickly with a 2022 major league debut date if he continues to have success.

69. Brailyn Marquez LHP (Cubs) - Another lefthander but Brailyn can hit triple digits with his fastball. At 6′4″ he also throws with a nice downward plane. What separates him from Lodolo is his lack of command. Last year he walked 50 hitters in just over 100 innings. Teams take a risk when they pay out big bonuses for international pitchers who have not even graduated from high school. The Cubs were willing to pay Marquez $600,000 in 2015 to sign him. He gets lots of swings and misses and last year the opposition hit him at just a .224 clip. The Cubs have had trouble developing pitchers, but Brailyn could be the first to have star quality since the Theo Epstein era. Brailyn will start the 2020 season in High A where if he does well he will quickly see AA. This will set him up for a major league debut in 2021,

68. Jesus Sanchez OF (Marlins) - The Rays were the first to sign him to a contract in 2014 for $400,000. They traded him to the Marlins for a couple young pitchers, Nick Anderson and Trevor Richards. Early in his career Jesus was thought of as a low level five tool player. His above average speed has not translated into stolen bases and he appears to be best suited for right field. The bat hits the ball as hard as any player but a lack of patience can leave him susceptible to a pitcher’s pitch. Last year at AA and AAA his OPS was only .723. Coming into the season his career OPS was .801. The tools seem to shout out better results. The Marlins are rebuilding and looking for players to make a difference. The 2020 season will be the one that defines Jesus as a major leaguer or a can’t miss who just did.

67. Daniel Lynch LHP (Royals) - Daniel was the third of three pitchers the Royals selected in the first round of the 2018 draft. He was the 34th pick in the draft. Brady Singer and Jackson Kowar were selected ahead of him. Daniel is the only lefthander of that group. He pitched for Virginia. At 6′6″ with a fastball tipping in the high 90s he can be intimidating from the left side. He also has quality secondary pitches, including a wicked slider that keeps hitters off balance. He seemed to be a little more hittable this year than last, with hitters swatting him at a .252 clip. Arm issues forced the Royals to shut him down for almost all of the second half of the season, though he did return to pitch in the AFL. He should start the 2020 season in AA where Brady Singer will get the first opportunity for a callup but Daniel will not be far behind.

66. Keibert Ruiz C (Dodgers) - Keibert signed with the Dodgers back in 2014 for $140,000. While he has reached AAA the Dodgers have Will Smith behind the plate, another rookie with a big bat. Keibert is not a liability behind the plate, but he lacks over the top tools to be a solid defensive catcher. His caught stealing percentage is below 30 percent. What will determine whether he gets called up is if his bat shows more potential than Will Smith. A finger fracture ended the season early for Keibert at just 85 games. He did get a 9 game opportunity at AAA. The power is there for him to juice 20 plus homeruns and his career minor league average is .299. He shows more consistency with the bat than Smith but may have less pop in his bat. The catching position is a fragile position. Ruiz will start the 2020 season in AAA and if an injury shelves Smith, Ruiz should get the call up.

65.Jazz Chisholm SS (Marlins) - Jazz originally signed with the Diamondbacks back in 2015 for $200,000. The Marlins traded Zac Gallen to acquire him. For a shortstop he has some pretty impressive power in his bat. Last year he mashed 21 homeruns. There is still a lot of swing and miss to his game with 147 whiffs in just 112 games. That inability to make contact put his average at .220. The tools are there for him to be a quality shortstop. The Marlins really have nobody to block him once Jazz is ready for the major leagues. The Marlins hope that major league career begins sometime by mid-season 2020.

64. Triston Casas 1B (Red Sox) - A first round pick of the Red Sox in 2018 and regular for Team USA in international tournaments. The Red Sox are a little high on pay roll and short on prospects entering the 2020 season. Triston heads the top prospect class with his power bat that slugged 20 homeruns last year. At 6′4″, 238 pounds Triston can send the ball a long ways. While he hit just .254 at Low A his ability to hit to all fields and a two strike approach indicate an ability to adjust and hit for a higher average once he gets used to the competition. He also is blessed with a good glove despite his size so the Red Sox will not see a need to hide him at DH. His speed is below average so a move to left field would not be best defensively. With Chavis, Dalbec and Casas the Red Sox have three corner infielders for two spots. Casas will not be ready for the major leagues until late 2021 and will be the last of the three to arrive with the Red Sox.

63. Alek Thomas OF (Diamondbacks) - The Diamondbacks were not able to sign their first round pick in 2018. Alek was a second round pick and the third player selected in the 2018 draft. He has the ability to slice line drives into the gaps and will live around the .300 barrier. How much power his bat will carry is in question and a below average arm could limit him to left field. He has the speed to play center which would be his best fit. His career batting average entering the 2020 season is .312 with a .455 slugging. The true test is whether he can maintain that hit tool as he rises up the minor leagues. Next year he should start the season in High A with a promotion to AA expected before the year is out. His major league debut could be late 2021 or 2022.

62. Hunter Greene RHP (Reds) - The Reds 2017 first round pick has not had the kind of success one expects from the second player selected in the draft. His fastball easily hits triple digits as it crosses the plate but its direction has always been a mystery. He did not pitch last year after Tommy John surgery. Command and improvement of his changeup will determine whether Greene will be destined for the starting rotation, or shifted to a closer role in the bullpen. Opponents have hit him at a .261 clip so despite the heat his fastball is not difficult to hit without the slower stuff to keep hitters off balance. As a high school player he was a pretty good hitter, but playing shortstop and pitching were too much to ask for in the arm. He could still become a two way player, but for now the Reds want to rehab him as a pitcher. His major league arrival is probably still three years away.

61. Xavier Edwards 2B/SS (Rays) - The Padres drafted Edwards in 2018 as a supplemental first round pick. The Rays acquired him and Hunter Renfroe in the Tommy Pham trade. Xavier is not a big player, standing less than 5′10″, but he peppers the gaps and has yet to hit less than .300 at any level he plays. He has plus speed to steal 30 plus bases a year. If he fails to stick in the middle infield that speed could be used to play centerfield. Defensively he has the tools to stick at short but with Franco ahead of him a move to second would be his best option. In his two years he has only one homerun, but his 75/79 walk to whiff ratio is evidence of his ability to make contact. He should be ready for the Rays in late 2021 or 2022.

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